The Great Secret and Its Unfoldment in Occultism: A Record of Forty Years' Experience in the Modern Mystery (Google eBook)

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G. Redway, 1895 - Spiritualism - 317 pages
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Page 281 - Of fleeting things, so certain to be lost. Clouds of affection from our younger eyes Conceal that emptiness which age descries. The soul's dark cottage, battered and decayed, Lets in new light through chinks that Time hath made...
Page 254 - How pure at heart and sound in head, With what divine affections bold Should be the man whose thought would hold An hour's communion with the dead.
Page 267 - There is not, in my opinion, a more pleasing and triumphant consideration in religion than this, of the perpetual progress which the soul makes towards the perfection of its nature, without ever arriving at a period in it.
Page 258 - I falter where I firmly trod, And falling with my weight of cares Upon the great world's altar-stairs That slope thro' darkness up to God, I stretch lame hands of faith, and grope, And gather dust and chaff, and call To what I feel is Lord of all, And faintly trust the larger hope.
Page 270 - And it shall come to pass, when your children shall say unto you, What mean ye by this service? That ye shall say, It is the sacrifice of the LORD'S passover, who passed over the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt, when he smote the Egyptians, and delivered our houses.
Page 250 - I can give not what men call love, But wilt thou accept not The worship the heart lifts above And the Heavens reject not, The desire of the moth for the star, Of the night for the morrow, The devotion to something afar From the sphere of our sorrow...
Page 162 - Now I hold it is not decent for a scientific gent To say another is an ass, at least, to all intent ; Nor should the individual who happens to be meant Reply by heaving rocks at him, to any great extent.
Page 187 - Innumerable, pitiless, passionless eyes, Cold fires, yet with power to burn and brand His nothingness into man.
Page 46 - I merely mean to say what Johnson said, That in the course of some six thousand years, All nations have believed that from the dead A visitant at intervals appears; And what is strangest upon this Strange head, Is, that whatever bar the reason rears 'Gainst such belief, there 's something Stronger Still In its behalf, let those deny who will.
Page 304 - The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was.

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