History of American Missions to the Heathen, from Their Commencement to the Present Time (Google eBook)

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Spooner & Howland, 1840 - Missions - 726 pages
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OCLC Number: 1385589
Related Subjects:(2)
Missions -- History.
Missions -- United States.
LCCN:BV
HathiTrust Full Text: http://hdl.handle.net/2027/wu.89077021996
 

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Page 250 - Again I say unto you, That if two of you shall agree on earth as touching any thing that they shall ask, it shall be done for them of my Father which is in heaven.
Page 360 - Thrice was I beaten with rods, once was I stoned, thrice I suffered shipwreck, a night and a day I have been in the deep ; in journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils by mine own countrymen, in perils by the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils among false brethren ; in weariness and painfumess, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness.
Page 600 - Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing? The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the Lord, and against his Anointed, saying, Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us.
Page 230 - I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith ; henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, shall give me at that day ; and not to me only, but to all them also that love his appearing.
Page 12 - ... win and incite the natives of [the] country to the knowledge and obedience of the only true God and Saviour of mankind, and the Christian faith, which in our royal intention, and the adventurers' free profession, is the principal end of this plantation.
Page 433 - I now began to think the very afflictions of Job had come upon me. When in health I could bear the various trials and vicissitudes through which I was called to pass. But to be confined with sickness, and unable to assist those who were so dear to me, when in distress, was almost too much for me to bear ; and had it not been for the consolations of religion, and an assured conviction that every additional trial was ordered by infinite love and mercy, I must have sunk under my accumulated sufferings.
Page 196 - The president also anxiously hopes that peace, and kindness, and justice, will prevail between your people and those citizens of the United States who visit your islands ; and that the regulations of your government will be such as to enforce them upon all. ' Our citizens who violate your laws, or interfere with your regulations, violate at the same time their duty to their own government and country, and merit censure and punishment.
Page 359 - Before I go whence I shall not return, Even to the land of darkness and the shadow of death ; A land of darkness, as darkness itself; And of the shadow of death, without any order, And where the light is as darkness.
Page 428 - I will send off a man immediately,' said he, 'to see what is to be done with them. You can do nothing more for your husband,' continued he ;
Page 428 - J's food myself, for the sake of getting in, and would then remain an hour or two, unless driven out. We had been in this comfortable situation but two or three days, when one morning, having carried in Mr. Judson's breakfast, which, in consequence of fever, he was unable to take, I remained longer than usual, when the governor in great haste sent for me. I promised...

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