Barbarian Migrations and the Roman West, 376-568

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 20, 2007 - History - 591 pages
2 Reviews
This is a major new survey of the barbarian migrations and their role in the fall of the Roman Empire and the creation of early medieval Europe, one of the key events in European history. Unlike previous studies it integrates historical and archaeological evidence and discusses Britain, Ireland, mainland Europe and North Africa, demonstrating that the Roman Empire and its neighbours were inextricably linked. A narrative account of the turbulent fifth and early sixth centuries is followed by a description of society and politics during the migration period and an analysis of the mechanisms of settlement and the changes of identity. Guy Halsall reveals that the creation and maintenance of kingdoms and empires was impossible without the active involvement of people in the communities of Europe and North Africa. He concludes that, contrary to most opinions, the fall of the Roman Empire produced the barbarian migrations, not vice versa.
  

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Review: Barbarian Migrations and the Roman West, 376-568

User Review  - Lucas - Goodreads

I wish I could give this one three and a half stars. While much of the content is excellent, Halsall also leaves his readers hanging with several unproven or poorly proven point. Halsall's ideas are ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
35
Section 3
60
Section 4
63
Section 5
80
Section 6
112
Section 7
119
Section 8
138
Section 14
220
Section 15
221
Section 16
239
Section 17
246
Section 18
256
Section 19
257
Section 20
275
Section 21
284

Section 9
154
Section 10
165
Section 11
186
Section 12
196
Section 13
199
Section 22
320
Section 23
371
Section 24
417
Section 25
455
Section 26
499

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About the author (2007)

GUY HALSALL is Professor of History at the University of York.

Bibliographic information