Shakespeariana; a Critical and Contemporary Review of Shakespearian Literature, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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L. Scott Publishing Company, 1886
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Page 169 - As in water face answereth to face, so the heart of man to man.
Page 549 - Yet mark'd I where the bolt of Cupid fell : It fell upon a little western flower, Before milk-white, now purple with love's wound, And maidens call it love-in-idleness.
Page 147 - I am myself indifferent honest; but yet I could accuse me of such things that it were better my mother had not borne me. I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious; with more offences at my beck than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them shape, or time to act them in. What should such fellows as I do crawling between earth and heaven? We are arrant knaves, all; believe none of us.
Page 530 - Family Shakspeare : In which nothing is added to the Original Text ; but those words and expressions are omitted which cannot with propriety be read aloud.
Page 146 - Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates : The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Page 147 - Heaven doth with us as we with torches do, Not light them for themselves ; for if our virtues Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike As if we had them not.
Page 153 - When we mean to build, We first survey the plot, then draw the model ; And when we see the figure of the house, Then must we rate the cost of the erection ; Which if we find outweighs ability, What do we then but draw anew the model In fewer offices, or at least desist To build at all...
Page 128 - How could communities, Degrees in schools, and brotherhoods in cities, Peaceful commerce from dividable shores The primogenitive and due of birth, Prerogative of age, crowns, sceptres, laurels, But by degree, stand in authentic place? Take but degree away, untune that string And hark! what discord follows; each thing meets In mere oppugnancy...
Page 592 - ... before, you were abused with divers stolen and surreptitious copies, maimed and deformed by the frauds and stealths of injurious impostors that exposed them, even those are now offered to your view cured and perfect of their limbs, and all the rest absolute in their numbers, as he conceived them ; who, as he was a happy imitator of nature, was a most gentle expresser of it.
Page 345 - Of thinking too precisely on the event, A thought which, quartered, hath but one part wisdom, And ever three parts coward, I do not know Why yet I live to say " This thing's to do " ; Sith I have cause and will and strength and means To do't.

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