Public Opinion (Google eBook)

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Transaction Publishers, 1946 - EE. UU - Política y gobierno - 427 pages
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Review: Public Opinion

User Review  - Alan - Goodreads

In times like these, when we sleep with screens feeding us images of war, it is important to go back to this classic. Emotions run high when photographs, pictures and videos rule our understanding of ... Read full review

Review: Public Opinion

User Review  - Robert - Goodreads

This book is unfairly maligned because Chomsky holds it out as an example of elite liberal ideology (and it is a fair example in that regard), but Lippmann has a point about "public opinion". He wasn ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter Page I The World Outside and the Pictures in Our Heads
3
PART H APPROACHES TO THE WORLD OUTSIDE II Censorship and Privacy
35
Contract and Opportunity
46
Time and Attention
58
Speed Words and Clearness
64
Stereotypes
79
Stereotypes as Defense
95
Blind Spots and Their Value
104
THE IMAGE OF DEMOCRACY
251
The SelfCentered Man
253
The SelfContained Community
263
The Role of Force Patronage and Privilege
276
Guild Socialism
293
A New Image
310
Chapter Page XXI The Buying Public
317
The Constant Reader
328

K Codes and Their Enemies
115
The Detection of Stereotypes
130
INTERESTS
157
The Enlisting of Intereset
159
Selfinterest Reconsidered
170
THE MAKING OF A COMMON WILL
191
The Transfer of Interest
193
Yes or No
220
Leaders and the Rank and File
234
The Nature of News
338
News Truth and a Conclusion
358
ORGANIZED INTELLIGENCE
367
The Entering Wedge
369
Intelligence Work
379
The Appeal to the Public
398
XXVffl The Appeal to Reason
411
Copyright

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Page vii - ... from turning round their heads. Above and behind them a fire is blazing at a distance, and between the fire and the prisoners there is a raised way; and you will see, if you look, a low wall built along the way, like the screen which marionette players have in front of them, over which they show the puppets.
Page vii - You have shown me a strange image, and they are strange prisoners. Like ourselves, I replied; and they see only their own shadows, or the shadows of one another which the fire throws on the opposite wall of the caver True, he said; how could they see anything but the shadows if they were never allowed to move their heads?

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