Introduction to the Study of English Literature (Google eBook)

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World book Company, 1914 - English literature - 542 pages
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Page 454 - I STROVE with none, for none was worth my strife; Nature I loved, and next to Nature, Art; I warmed both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.
Page 370 - I was alarmed, and prayed God, that however he might afflict my body, he would spare my understanding. This prayer, that I might try the integrity of my faculties, I made in Latin verse. The lines were not very good, but I knew them not to be very good: I made them easily, and concluded myself to be unimpaired in my faculties.
Page 135 - FORGET six counties overhung with smoke, Forget the snorting steam and piston stroke, Forget the spreading of the hideous town; Think rather of the pack-horse on the down, And dream of London, small, and white, and clean, The clear Thames bordered by its gardens green...
Page 270 - I write of youth, of love, and have access By these, to sing of cleanly wantonness ; I sing of dews, of rains, and, piece by piece, Of balm, of oil, of spice, and ambergris ; I sing of times trans-shifting ; and I write How roses first came red, and lilies white...
Page 74 - And thou were the kindest man that ever struck with sword. And thou were the goodliest person that ever came among press of knights. And thou was the meekest man and the gentlest that ever ate in hall among ladies. And thou were the sternest knight to thy mortal foe that ever put spear in the rest.
Page 307 - The wrong, than others the right way; Compound for sins they are inclined to By damning those they have no mind to.
Page 316 - I'll try to make their several beauties known, And show their verses worth tho' not my own. .Long had our dull forefathers slept supine, Nor felt the raptures of the tuneful Nine, Till Chaucer first, a merry bard, arose, And many a story told in rhyme and prose. But age has rusted what the poet writ, Worn out his language, and obscured his wit; In vain he jests in his unpolished strain, And tries to make his readers laugh in vain.
Page 74 - And now I dare to say thou wert never matched of none earthly knight's hand. And thou wert the courteousest knight that ever bare shield ; and thou wert the truest friend to thy lover that ever bestrode horse; and thou were the truest lover, of a sinful man, that ever loved woman ; and thou wert the kindest man that ever struck with sword.
Page 244 - Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love, Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove : 0, no ; it is an ever-fixed mark, That looks on tempests, and is never shaken ; It is the star to every wandering bark, Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Page 410 - I will not cease from Mental Fight, Nor shall my Sword sleep in my hand Till we have built Jerusalem In England's green and pleasant Land.

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