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Books Books 1 - 10 of 14 on I declined to adopt the view that what was imperatively necessary for the nation....  
" I declined to adopt the view that what was imperatively necessary for the nation could not be done by the President unless he could find some specific authorization to do it. My belief was that it was not only his right but his duty to do anything that... "
Theodore Roosevelt: An Autobiography - Page 389
by Theodore Roosevelt - 1913 - 647 pages
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From 1897-1916

Edward Stanwood - Presidents - 1916
...or imposed by Congress under its constitutional powers." In another form he puts it as his " belief that it was not only his right but his duty to do...was forbidden by the Constitution or by the laws." It is a long way to that view of the President's power from the provision of the Constitution itself...
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War Powers of the Executive in the United States

Clarence Arthur Berdahl - Constitutional law - 1921 - 296 pages
...high position was a steward of the people bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people, and not to content himself with the negative...Constitution or by the laws. Under this interpretation I did and caused to be done many things not previously done by the President and the heads of the departments....
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University of Illinois Studies in the Social Sciences, Volume 9

Social sciences - 1921 - 245 pages
...by the President unless he could find some specific authorization to do it. ijy belief was T* thst it was not only his right but his duty to do anything...Constitution or by the laws. Under this interpretation I did and caused to be done many things n»t previously done by the President and the heads of the...
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History of the United States

Charles Austin Beard, Mary Ritter Beard - United States - 1921 - 663 pages
...Roosevelt took exactly the opposite position. It was his opinion that it was not only the President's right but his duty " to do anything that the needs...unless such action was forbidden by the Constitution or the laws." He went on to say that he acted " for the common well-being of all our people whenever and...
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University of Illinois Studies in the Social Sciences, Volume 9

Social sciences - 1921
...high position was a steward of the people bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people, and not to content himself with the negative...Constitution or by the laws. Under this interpretation I did and caused to be done many things not previously done by the President and the heads of the departments....
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The Constitutional Review, Volume 2

Constitutional law - 1918
...nation could not be clone by the President unless he could find some specific authorization to do 62 63 it. My belief was that it was not only his right but...was forbidden by the Constitution or by the laws." As to Washington's proclamation, it caused much alarm to Jefferson, although he had declared that "the...
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The Decline and Resurgence of Congress

James L. Sundquist - Political Science - 2002 - 500 pages
...in his own favor. Identifying himself with the ‘¿JacksonLincoln theory of the presidency,” he declined to adopt the view that what was imperatively...was forbidden by the Constitution or by the laws... . I did not usurp power, but I did greatly broaden the use of executive power.¿ Roosevelt so transformed...
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The Constitution in the Supreme Court: The Second Century, 1888-1986

David P. Currie - History - 1994 - 668 pages
...Taft, supra note 220, at 139-47 (taking issue with Theodore Roosevelt's view that the President might "do anything that the needs of the Nation demanded...was forbidden by the Constitution or by the laws": "The President can exercise no power which cannot be fairly and reasonably traced to some specific...
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The Constitution and the American Presidency

Martin L. Fausold, Alan Shank - Political Science - 1991 - 323 pages
...theory of government espoused most forcefully by Theodore Roosevelt. Like Lincoln, Roosevelt rejected "the view that what was imperatively necessary for...was forbidden by the Constitution or by the laws." 34 The difference was that, by necessity, Lincoln meant something more urgent than Roosevelt, who believed...
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The Constitution Besieged: The Rise and Demise of Lochner Era Police Powers ...

Howard Gillman - Law - 1992 - 317 pages
...every officer, and above all every executive officer in high position, was a steward of the people.... I declined to adopt the view that what was imperatively...was forbidden by the Constitution or by the laws." The expansion of executive power was necessary because no other part of the federal government was...
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