Humanistic Studies (Google eBook)

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University of Kansas, 1916 - Philology
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Page 42 - The whole is a passing pageant, where we should sit as unconcerned at the issues, for life or death, as at a battle of the frogs and mice. But, like Don Quixote, we take part against the puppets, and quite as impertinently.
Page 205 - Will't please you rise? We'll meet The company below, then. I repeat, The Count your master's known munificence Is ample warrant that no just pretence Of mine for dowry will be disallowed; Though his fair daughter's self, as I avowed At starting, is my object. Nay, we'll go Together down, sir. Notice Neptune, though, Taming a sea-horse, thought a rarity, Which Claus of Innsbruck cast in bronze for me!
Page 42 - I come back to my cage and my restraint the fresher and more healthy for it. I wear my shackles more contentedly for having respired the breath of an imaginary freedom. I do not know how it is with others, but I feel the better always for the perusal of one of Congreve's — nay, why should I not add even of Wycherley's — comedies. I am the gayer at least for it; and I \j could never connect those sports of a witty fancy in any shape with any result to be drawn from them to imitation in real life.
Page 63 - A Letter from Mr. Gibber to Mr. Pope, Inquiring into the Motives that might induce him in his Satyrical Works, to be frequently fond of Mr. Cibber's Name.
Page 64 - Quod vitium procul afore chartis Atque animo prius, ut si quid promittere de me Possum aliud vere, promitto. Liberius si Dixero quid, si forte jocosius, hoc mihi juris Cum venia dabis : insuevit pater optimus hoc me, Ut fugerem exemplis vitiorum quaeque notando.
Page 154 - Freedom is the relation of the concrete self to the act which it performs. This relation is indefinable, just because we are free.
Page 42 - It is altogether a speculative scene of things, which has no reference whatever to the world that is. No good person can be justly offended as a spectator, because no good person suffers on the stage. Judged morally, every character in these plays — the few exceptions only are mistakes— is alike essentially vain and worthless.
Page 42 - When we are among them, we are amongst a chaotic people. We are not to judge them by our usages. No reverend institutions are insulted by their proceedings, for they have none among them. No peace of families is violated, for no family ties exist among them. No purity of the marriage bed is stained, for none is supposed to have a being.
Page 21 - This last was a play made up of what little was tolerable in two or three others that had no success, and were laid aside as so much poetical lumber...
Page 137 - Life as a whole, from the initial impulsion that thrust it into the world, will appear as a wave which rises, and which is opposed by the descending movement of matter. On the greater part of its surface, at different heights, the current is converted by matter into a vortex. At one point alone it passes freely, dragging with it the obstacle which will weigh on its progress but will not stop it. At this point is humanity; it is our privileged situation.

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