Lives of the British admirals, and naval history of Great Britain, chiefly abridged from the work of J. Campbell (Google eBook)

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1841
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Page 494 - By this time all feeling below the breast was gone, and Nelson having made the surgeon ascertain this, said to him, " You know I am gone. I know it. I feel something rising in my breast " — putting his hand on his left side —
Page 493 - Redoubtable, supposing that she had struck because her great guns were silent; for as she carried no flag there was no means of instantly ascertaining the fact. From this ship, which he had thus twice spared, he received his death. A ball fired from her...
Page 490 - Blackwood made answer, that he thought the whole fleet seemed very clearly to understand what they were about. These words were scarcely spoken before that signal was made, which will be remembered as long as the language, or even the memory, of England shall endure— Nelson's last signal: 'ENGLAND EXPECTS EVERY MAN TO DO HIS DUTY!' It was received throughout the fleet with a shout of answering acclamation, made sublime by the spirit which it breathed, and the feeling which it expressed. 'Now,'...
Page 495 - Death was, indeed, rapidly approaching. He said to the chaplain, " Doctor, I have not been a great sinner ;" and after a short pause, " Remember that I leave Lady Hamilton and my daughter Horatia as a legacy to my country." His articulation now became difficult ; but he was distinctly heard to say, " Thank God, I have done my duty !" These words he repeatedly pronounced ; and they were the last words which he uttered.
Page 495 - Kiss me, Hardy," said he. Hardy knelt down and kissed his cheek, and Nelson said: "Now I am satisfied. Thank God, I have done my duty!" Hardy stood over him in silence for a moment or two, then knelt again and kissed his forehead. "Who is that?" said Nelson; and being informed, he replied: "God bless you, Hardy.
Page 493 - you can do nothing for me." All that could be done was to fan him with paper, and frequently to give him lemonade to alleviate his intense thirst. He was in great pain, and expressed much anxiety for the event of the action, which now began to declare itself. As often as a ship struck, the crew of the Victory...
Page 119 - Here die I, Richard Greenville, with a joyful and quiet mind : for that I have ended my life as a true soldier ought to do, fighting for his country, queen, religion, and honour. My soul willingly departing from this body, leaving behind the lasting fame of having behaved as every valiant soldier is in his duty bound to do.
Page 490 - That officer answered that considering the handsome way in which battle was offered by the enemy, their apparent determination for a fair trial of strength, and the situation of the land, he thought it would be a glorious result if fourteen were captured. He replied: "I shall not be satisfied with less than twenty.
Page 494 - Captain Hardy, some fifty minutes after he had left the cockpit, returned ; and, again taking the hand of his dying friend and commander, congratulated him on having gained a complete victory. How many of the enemy were taken he did not know, as it was impossible to perceive them distinctly ; but fourteen or fifteen at least. " That's well, cried Nelson,
Page 490 - Ornaments which rendered him so conspicuous a mark for the enemy, were beheld with ominous apprehensions by his officers. It was known that there were riflemen on board the French ships; and it could not be doubted but that his life would be particularly aimed at. They communicated their fears to each other; and the surgeon, Mr.

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