Sir Edwin Landseer (Google eBook)

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1880
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Page 76 - Here the exquisite execution of the glossy and crisp hair of the dog, the bright sharp touching of the green bough beside it, the clear painting of the wood of the coffin and the folds of the blanket, are language language clear and expressive in the highest degree. But the close pressure of the dog's breast against the wood, the convulsive clinging of the paws, which has dragged the blanket off the trestle, the total powerlessness of the head laid, close and motionless, upon its folds, the fixed...
Page 15 - Many a time have I lifted him over this very stile. I then lived in Foley Street, and nearly all the way between Marylebone and Hampstead was open fields. It was a favourite walk with my boys; and one day when I had accompanied them, Edwin stopped by this stile to admire some sheep and cows which were quietly grazing. At his request I lifted him over, and finding a scrap of paper and a pencil in my pocket, I made him sketch the cow. He was very young indeed, then not more than six or seven years...
Page 76 - ... trestle, the total powerlessness of the head laid, close and motionless, upon its folds, the fixed and tearful fall of the eye in its utter hopelessness, the rigidity of repose which marks that there has been no motion nor change in the trance of agony since the last blow was struck on the coffin-lid, the quietness and gloom of the chamber, the spectacles marking the place where the Bible was last closed, indicating how lonely has been the life how...
Page 30 - In 1815 Mr Landseer, the engraver, had brought his boys to me and said: " When do you let your beard grow and take pupils ? " I said, " If my instructions are useful or valuable, now." " Will you let my boys come?
Page 76 - But the close pressure of the dog's breast against the wood, the convulsive clinging of the paws, which has dragged the blanket off the trestle, the total powerlessness of the head laid, close and motionless, upon its folds, the fixed and tearful fall of the eye in its utter hopelessness, the rigidity of repose which marks that there has been no motion nor change in the trance of agony since the last blow was struck on the...
Page 80 - The butler on entering was bewildered at hearing his master's voice ordering more claret from the head of the table, and seeing his master's outward form in another part of the room. No matter who may be the object of the versatile painter's skill in this department, the illusion is perfect, and combines...
Page 76 - ... change in the trance of agony since the last blow was struck on the coffin-lid, the quietness and gloom of the chamber, the spectacles marking the place where the Bible was last closed, indicating how lonely has been the life, how unwatched the departure, of him who is now laid solitary in his sleep; these are all thoughts thoughts by which the picture is separated at once from hundreds of equal merit as far as mere painting goes, by which it ranks as a work of the highest art, and stamps...
Page 58 - ... Elizabeth Whitbread replied, " The great fermentator is much obliged to Mr. Smith for giving him the preference." He answered, " I have received your ladyship's note, and kill myself on the spot." ' Edwin Landseer said to him, " With your love of humour, it must be a great self-denial to abstain from the theatres." " The managers," he replied, " are very polite ; they send me free admissions, which I can't use ; and, in return, I send them free admissions to St. Paul's.
Page 65 - The pencils were got, a piece of paper was laid on the table, and Sir Edwin, a pencil in each hand, drew simultaneously, and without hesitation, with one hand the profile of a stag's head and all its antlers complete, and with the other the perfect profile of a horse's head. Both drawings were full of energy and spirit, and although, as the occasion compelled, not finished, they were, together and individually, quite as good as the master...
Page 30 - ... and Thomas, it was immediately arranged, should come every Monday morning, when I was to give them work for the week. Edwin took my dissections of the lion, and I advised him to dissect animals as the only mode of acquiring a knowledge of their construction. " This very incident generated in me the desire to form a school, and as the Landseers made rapid progress, I resolved to communicate my system to others." In 1817 Landseer exhibited a picture of " Brutus,

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