News That Matters: Television and American Opinion, Updated Edition (Google eBook)

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University of Chicago Press, Oct 15, 2010 - Political Science - 216 pages
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Almost twenty-five years ago, Shanto Iyengar and Donald R. Kinder first documented a series of sophisticated and innovative experiments that unobtrusively altered the order and emphasis of news stories in selected television broadcasts.  Their resulting book News That Matters, now hailed as a classic by scholars of political science and public opinion alike, is here updated for the twenty-first century, with a new preface and epilogue by the authors. Backed by careful analysis of public opinion surveys, the authors show how, despite changing American politics, those issues that receive extended coverage in the national news become more important to viewers, while those that are ignored lose credibility. Moreover, those issues that are prominent in the news stream continue to loom more heavily as criteria for evaluating the president and for choosing between political candidates.

News That Matters does matter, because it demonstrates conclusively that television newscasts powerfully affect opinion. . . . All that follows, whether it supports, modifies, or challenges their conclusions, will have to begin here.”—The Public Interest

  

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Contents

1 A Primordial Power?
1
Experimentation and the Analysis of Televisions Power
6
3 The AgendaSetting Effect
16
4 Vivid Cases and Lead Stories
34
5 Personal Predicaments and National Problems
47
6 Victims of AgendaSetting
54
7 The Priming Effect
63
8 Priming and Presidential Character
73
11 Electoral Consequences of Priming
98
12 News That Matters
112
Epilogue 2010
135
Appendix A
148
Appendix B
150
Notes
167
Bibliography
185
Index
197

9 Priming and Presidential Responsibility
82
10 Victims of Priming
90

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About the author (2010)

Shanto Iyengar is the Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication, professor of political science, and director of the Political Communication Lab at Stanford University. He is the author of several other books. Donald R. Kinder is the Philip E. Converse Collegiate Professor in the Department of Political Science and professor of psychology and research professor in the Center for Political Studies of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, as well as the author of several additional books.

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