Why is Q Always Followed by U?: Word-Perfect Answers to the Most-Asked Questions About Language

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Penguin Adult, 2010 - Humor - 368 pages
4 Reviews

Long-time word-detective and bestselling author of Port Out, Starboard Home, Michael Quinion brings us the answers to nearly two hundred of the most intriguing questions he s been asked about language over the years. Sent to him by enquiring readers from all around the globe, Michael s answers about the meanings and histories behind the quirky phrases, slang and language that we all use are set to delight, amuse and enlighten even the most hardened word-obsessive.

Did you know that Blighty comes from an ancient Arabic word? Or that Liberace cried his way to the bank so many times people think he came up with the phrase? That cloud nine started out as cloud seven in the speakeasies of 30s America? And that the first person to have their thunder stolen was a dismal playwright from Drury Lane?

Michael Quinion s Why is Q Always Followed By U? is full of surprising discoveries, entertaining quotations and memorable information. There are plenty of colourful stories out there, but Michael Quinion will help you discover the truth that lies behind the cock-and-bull stories and make sure you re always linguistically on the ball.

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Review: Why is Q Always Followed by U?: Word-Perfect Answers to the Most Asked Questions About Language

User Review  - Gary - Goodreads

If you like this sort of book you'll love this particular one. Quinion is a joy to read. Loved it. Read full review

Review: Why is Q Always Followed by U?: Word-Perfect Answers to the Most Asked Questions About Language

User Review  - Kristen - Goodreads

This book is probably only of interest to other "word-nerds" like me, who find it fascinating to learn where the many common sayings we all use came from and how they developed into common use. But I ... Read full review

About the author (2010)

Michael Quinion, author of the bestselling Port Out, Starboard Home, has always been fascinated by language. His lexophilia really began in earnest in 1991, when, realising so many new words were missing from the Oxford English Dictionary, he started sending examples of them to the editors. He eventually became an official freelance reader and in the past sixteen years, he has sent in over 160,000 citations. Not satisfied with merely helping the OED, Michael Quinion set up his own language website in 1997, worldwidewords.org. The site has become a huge success as people all over the world ask Michael to tease out the truth behind the quirks of our language.

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