Survivable Networks: Algorithms for Diverse Routing (Google eBook)

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Springer Science & Business Media, 1999 - Computers - 200 pages
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Survivable Networks: Algorithms for Diverse Routing provides algorithms for diverse routing to enhance the survivability of a network. It considers the common mesh-type network and describes in detail the construction of physically disjoint paths algorithms for diverse routing. The algorithms are developed in a systematic manner, starting with shortest path algorithms appropriate for disjoint paths construction. Key features of the algorithms are optimality and simplicity. Although the algorithms have been developed for survivability of communication networks, they are in a generic form, and thus applicable in other scientific and technical disciplines to problems that can be modeled as a network.
A notable highlight of this book is the consideration of real-life telecommunication networks in detail. Such networks are described not only by nodes and links, but also by the actual physical elements, called span nodes and spans. The sharing of spans (the actual physical links) by the network (logical) links complicates the network, requiring new algorithms. This book is the first one to provide algorithms for such networks.
Survivable Networks: Algorithms for Diverse Routing is a comprehensive work on physically disjoint paths algorithms. It is an invaluable resource and reference for practicing network designers and planners, researchers, professionals, instructors, students, and others working in computer networking, telecommunications, and related fields.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
12 DEFINITIONS AND NOTATIONS
14
13 TYPES OF GRAPHS CONSIDERED
18
SHORTEST PATH ALGORITHMS
21
22 THE DIJKSTRA ALGORITHM
22
23 THE MODIFIED DIJKSTRA ALGORITHM
29
24 THE BREADTHFIRSTSEARCH BFS SHORTEST PATH ALGORITHM
33
25 CONCLUDING REMARKS
35
51 FIBER NETWORK DESCRIPTION
118
52 SHORTEST PAIR OF PHYSICALLY DISJOINT PATHS ALGORITHM
123
53 APPLICATION TO OTHER POSSIBLE CONFIGURATIONS
148
54 CONCLUDING REMARKS
155
MAXIMALLY DISJOINT PATHS ALGORITHMS FOR ARBITRARY NETWORK CONFIGURATIONS
157
61 GENERAL APPROACH
158
63 OPTIMAL ALGORITHM FOR MAXIMAL DISJOINTNESS
162
K 2 DISJOINT PATHS ALGORITHMS
175

SHORTEST PAIR OF DISJOINT PATHS ALGORITHMS
39
32 THE SIMPLE TWOSTEPAPPROACH ALGORITHMS AND THEIR SHORTCOMINGS
40
33 EDGEDISJOINT SHORTEST PAIR ALGORITHM DEVELOPMENT
46
34 VERTEXDISJOINT SHORTEST PAIR ALGORITHM DEVELOPMENT
68
35 SUURBALLES DISJOINT PAIR ALGORITHMS
86
36 COMPARISON OF THE DEVELOPED ALGORITHMS AND THE SUURBALLES ALGORITHMS
92
MAXIMALLY DISJOINT PATHS AND PHYSICAL DIVERSITY VERSUS COST ALGORITHMS
93
41 IMPLEMENTATION OF EDGEDISJOINT PATHS ALGORITHMS
94
42 IMPLEMENTATION OF VERTEXDISJOINT PATHS ALGORITHMS
99
43 PHYSICAL DISJOINTNESS VERSUS COST
108
PHYSICALLY DISJOINT PATHS IN REALLIFE TELECOMMUNICATION FIBER NETWORKS
117
72 K 2 VERTEXDISJOINT PATHS ALGORITHMS
179
73 IMPLEMENTATION OF K 2 DISJOINT PATHS ALGORITHMS
182
DISJOINT PATHS MULTIPLE SOURCES AND DESTINATIONS
183
82 TWO SOURCES SINGLE DESTINATION
184
83 TWO SOURCES TWO DESTINATIONS UNFIXED SOURCEDESTINATION PAIRS
185
84 TWO SOURCES TWO DESTINATIONS FIXED SOURCEDESTINATION PAIRS
186
FURTHER RESEARCH
189
REFERENCES
191
INDEX
195
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About the author (1999)

Bhandari, AT&T Laboratories, Lincroft, NJ, USA.

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