The doctors of Dull-head college, a droll formed out of the lost play of 'The father's own son', ed. by J. O. Halliwell (Google eBook)

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1860
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Page 10 - When the publique Theatres were shut up, and the Actors forbidden to present us with any of their Tragedies, because we had enough of that in earnest ; and Comedies, because the Vices of the Age were too lively and smartly represented ; then all that we could divert ourselves with were these humours and pieces of Plays, which passing under the Name of a merry conceited Fellow, called Bottom the Weaver, Simpleton the Smith, John Swabber, or some such title, were only allowed us, and that but by stealth...
Page 11 - I heard him cryed up for his John Swabber, and Simpleton the Smith? In which he being to appear with a large piece of Bread and Butter, I have frequently known several of the Female Spectators and Auditors to long for some -of it : and once that well known Natural, Jack Adams of Clarkemvel, seeing him with Bread and Butter on the Stage, and knowing him, cryed out, Cuz, Cuz, give me some, give me some ; to the great pleasure of the Audience.
Page 13 - ... Cost in Cloaths, which often were in great danger to be seized by the then Souldiers ; who, as the Poet sayes, Enter the Red Coat, Exit Hat and Cloak, was very true, not only in the Audience, but the Actors too, were commonly, not only strip'd, but many times imprisoned, till they paid such Ransom as the Souldiers would impose upon them ; so that it was hazardous to Act any thing that required any good Cloaths, instead of which painted Cloath many times served the turn to represent Rich Habits.
Page 10 - Simpleton the Smith, John Swabber, or some such Title, were only allowed us, and that but by stealth too, and under pretence of Rope-dancing, or the like; and these being all that was permitted us, great was the confluence of the Auditors; and these small things were as profitable, and as great getpennies to the Actors as any of our late famed Plays.
Page 10 - I have seen the Red Bull Play-House, which was a large one, so full, that as many went back for want of room as had entred; and as meanly as you may think of these Drols, they were then Acted by the best Comedians then and now in being...
Page 12 - ... of the town came to him, saying, ' Well, although your father speaks so ill of you, yet when the fair is done, if you will come and work with me, I will give you twelve pence a week more than I give any other journeyman.' Thus was he taken for a smith bred, that was, indeed, as much of any trade.
Page 6 - Sonne, &c., doe all and every of them properly and of right belong to the sayd house, and consequently that they are all in his propriety ; and to the end that any other companies of actors in or about London shall not...
Page 14 - The fainting was every wayes as defective and lame as the Poetry, for I believe he who pictured King Pharaoh had never seen a King in his Life, for all the Majesty he was represented with was goggle Eyes, that his Picture might be answerable to the Verse.
Page 9 - When the publique theatres were shut up," says Kirkman,f " and the actors forbidden to present us with any of their tragedies, because we had enough of that in ernest ; and comedies, because the vices of the age were too lively and smartly represented ; then all that we could divert ourselves with were these humours and pieces of plays, which passing under the name of a merry conceited fellow called Bottom the Weaver, Simpleton the Smith, John Swabber, or...
Page 22 - Speak like a man of worship. Fran. Thou art a mad companion ; never staid, Tom ? Tho. Let rogues be staid that have no habitation ; A gentleman may wander. Sit thee down, Frank, And see what I have brought thee. Come, discover ; [Drauu out a bottle.

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