The Afterlife of the Platonic Soul: Reflections of Platonic Psychology in the Monotheistic Religions

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Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth, John Myles Dillon
BRILL, 2009 - Religion - 236 pages
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Plato's doctrine of the soul, its immaterial nature, its parts or faculties, and its fate after death (and before birth) came to have an enormous influence on the great religious traditions that sprang up in late antiquity, beginning with Judaism (in the person of Philo of Alexandria), and continuing with Christianity, from St. Paul on through the Alexandrian and Cappadocian Fathers to Byzantium, and finally with Islamic thinkers from Al-kindi on. This volume, while not aspiring to completeness, attempts to provide insights into how members of each of these traditions adapted Platonist doctrines to their own particular needs, with varying degrees of creativity.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
A EARLY PERIOD
15
Philo of Alexandria and Platonist Psychology John Dillon
17
St Paul on Soul Spirit and the Inner Man George H van Kooten
25
B CHRISTIAN TRADITION
45
The Perishability Axiom and Its Impact on Christian Views about the Origin and Nature of the Soul Dirk Krausmüller
47
The Nature of the Soul According to Eriugena Catherine Kavanagh
77
C ISLAMIC TRADITION
93
D JUDAIC TRADITION
141
A Case Study of Abraham Ibn Ezra and Judah Halevi Aaron W Hughes
143
Maimonides the Soul and the Classical Tradition Oliver Leaman
163
E LATER MEDIEVAL PERIOD
177
St Thomas Aquinass Concept of the Human Soul and the Influence of Platonism Patrick Quinn
179
Intellect as Intrinsic Formal Cause in the Soul according to Aquinas and Averroes Richard C Taylor
187
Bibliography
221
Index of Names
231

An Annotated Translation of alKindïs That There are Separate Substances Peter Adamson and Peter E Pormann
95
Islam Plato and the Ikhwän alSafä Ian Richard Netton
107
Tradition and Innovation in the Psychology of Fakhr alDïn alRäzï Maha ElkaisyFriemuth
121

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About the author (2009)

Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth, Ph.D. in Islamic Studies, University of Birmingham, Lecturer in Islamic studies at Leuven Catholic University, Belgium. She has published extensively on Islamic philosophy including "God and Humans in Islamic thought" (Routledge, 2006); Al-Radd al-Jamil: Ghazalis or Pseudo Ghazali, in D. Thomas, "The Bible in Arab Christianity" (Brill, 2007). John M. Dillon, Ph. D. (1969) in Classics, University of California at Berkeley, is Regius Professor of Greek (Emeritus) at Trinity College, Dublin. He has published extensively on various aspects of the Platonic tradition, including "The Middle Platonists" (Duckworth,1977), "Iamblichus De Anima" (with John Finamore, Brill, 2002), and "The Heirs of Plato" (Oxford, 2003).