Addresses to the German Nation (Google eBook)

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Open court publishing Company, 1922 - Education and state - 269 pages
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Fichte Addresses to the German Nation
Germany did not exist as a nation when Fichte lectured with French troops marching outside. Fichte proposed to expand universal education in Germany to produce
a will to do good in every student until the entire population had a single will. The Second Address, items numbered 19 and 20, describes the creative activity each student needs to use to imagine a good prototype. Once physical needs have been satisfied, the ability of the student to imagine the good of the community needs to be tested to make sure each student is learning for the love of learning. Seeking “ever new life,” (p. 26) Fichte reminds us:
This is possible only
where progress is regular,
and where every mistake in education
is discovered immediately
through the failure of what was intended. (p. 26).
Now that electronic communication makes it possible for each individual to find some stimulation of a sensual nature in each waking moment and while falling asleep, snoozing for morning intervals, we are more like a song called Pinch Me:
I could leave but I might stay.
All my stuff's here anyway.
 

Contents

I
xi
II
1
III
19
IV
36
V
52
VII
72
VIII
91
IX
108
X
130
XI
152
XII
169
XIII
187
XIV
205
XV
223
XVI
248
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Page 51 - Thus saith the Lord God unto these bones ; Behold, I will cause breath to enter into you, and ye shall live : and I will lay sinews upon you, and will bring up flesh upon you, and cover you with skin, and put breath in you, and ye shall live ; and ye shall know that I am the Lord.
Page 51 - hand of the Lord was upon me, and carried me out in the spirit of the Lord, and set me down in the midst of the valley -which was full of bones, and caused me to pass by them round about : and, behold, there were very many in the open valley ; and, lo, they were very dry. And he said unto me, Son of man, can these bones live ? And I answered, O Lord God, Thou knowest.
Page 51 - Then said he unto me, Prophesy unto the wind, prophesy, son of man, and say to the wind, Thus saith the Lord God ; Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain, that they may live.
Page 51 - Prophesy upon these bones, and' say unto them, O ye dry bones, hear the word of the Lord. Thus saith the Lord God unto these bones : Behold, I will cause breath to enter into you, and ye shall live ; and I will lay sinews upon you, and will bring up flesh upon you, and cover you with skin, and put breath in you, and ye shall live ; and ye shall know that I am the Lord.
Page 56 - Nation goes so far as to say that 'we give the name of people to men whose organs of speech are influenced by the same external conditions, who live together, and who develop their language in continuous communication with each other'.
Page 126 - The principle according to which it has to close its circle is laid before it : whoever believes in spirituality and in the freedom of this spirituality, and who wills the eternal development of this spirituality by freedom, wherever he may have been born and whatever language he speaks, is of our blood ; he is one of us, and will come over to our side.
Page 20 - The new education must consist essentially in this, that it completely destroys freedom of will in the soil which it undertakes to cultivate, and produces on the contrary strict necessity in the decisions of the will, the opposite being impossible. Such a will can henceforth be relied upon with confidence and certainty.
Page 224 - ... it is not because men dwell between certain mountains and rivers that they are a people, but, on the contrary, men dwell together—and, if their luck has so arranged it, are protected by rivers and mountains—because they were a people already by a law of nature which is much higher.
Page 51 - So I prophesied as he commanded me, and the " breath came into them, and they lived, and stood up " upon their feet an exceeding great army.
Page 137 - But he to whom a fatherland has been handed down, and in whose soul heaven and earth, visible and invisible meet and mingle, and thus, and only thus, create a true and enduring heaven - such a man fights to the last drop of his blood to hand on the precious possession unimpaired to his posterity.

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