Journalism Today: A Themed History (Google eBook)

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John Wiley & Sons, Feb 10, 2011 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 352 pages
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Journalism Today: A Themed History provides a cultural approach to journalism's history through the exploration of overarching concepts, as opposed to a typical chronological overview. Rich with illuminating stories and biographies of key figures, it sheds new light on the relationship between the press and society and how each has shaped the other.
  • Thematic study of the history of journalism, examining the role of journalism in democracy, the influence of new technology, the challenge of balancing ethical values, and the role of the audience
  • Charts the influence of the historical press for today’s news in print, broadcast, and new media
  • Situates journalism in a rich cultural context with lively examples and case studies that bring the subject alive for contemporary readers
  • Provides a comparative analysis of American, British, and international journalism
  • Helpful feature boxes on important figures and case studies enhance student understanding of the development of journalism and news as we know it today, providing a convenient springboard for follow-up work.
  

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Contents

A Themed History Introduction The Uses and Abuses of History Why Bother With It?
1
A Themed History Part I Journalism and Democracy A Sibling Rivalry?
13
A Themed History Part II Technology Work and Business Is Journalism More Than Just a Job?
97
A Themed History Part III Ethics A Matter of Judgment?
173
A Themed History Part IV Audience Citizen Consumer or Consumer Citizen?
219
A Themed History Part V Conclusion A Future History
297
A Themed History Index
317
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About the author (2011)

Jane L. Chapman is Professor of Communications at University of Lincoln School of Journalism and visiting Fellow at Cambridge University and University College Dublin School of History. Her books include Issues in Contemporary Documentary (2009); Broadcast Journalism: a Critical Introduction (with Marie Kinsey, 2008); Documentary in Practice (2007) and the best-selling Comparative Media History (2005). Her research interests include press history and the media's relationship to women and indigenous minorities.

Nick Nuttall is senior lecturer and MA program leader at the University of Lincoln School of Journalism. He worked for many years in East Africa, the Middle East and Cyprus, writing on travel and communication issues. He has authored a chapter on Truman Capote and New Journalism for The Journalistic Imagination (2007) as well as a chapter on investigative journalism for the latest edition of The Newspapers Handbook (2006). His research interests include New Journalism, press history, and the gonzo journalism of Hunter S. Thompson.

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