They Call Me Agnes: A Crow Narrative Based on the Life of Agnes Yellowtail Deernose

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University of Oklahoma Press, May 1, 2001 - Social Science - 256 pages
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In They Call Me Agnes, the narrator, Agnes Deernose, provides a warm, personal view of Crow Indian family life and culture.

Fred Voget, anthropologist and adopted Crow, sets the stage for Agnesís story, which he compiled from extensive interviews with Agnes and her friends. He describes the origins of the Crows and their culture during buffalo-hunting days and early reservation life. Through Agnes, an elderly Crow woman, he also reveals changes wrought on this once far-ranging, independent tribe by twentieth-century forces.

  

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Contents

Historic Crow and Reservation Culture
3
Im Born a Crow Indian
35
My Family and Relatives
49
Growing Up
65
School Education and Church
93
Courtship and Marriage
115
Life Without Donnie The Complete Bear
154
Celebrating the Year Together
168
Bibliography
203
Index
213
Copyright

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Page 208 - The Effects of European Culture Contacts upon the Economic, Social, and Religious Life of Crow Indians.

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About the author (2001)

Fred W. Voget, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, was the author of "The Shoshoni-Crow Sundance", also published by the University of Oklahoma Press. Mary K. Mee, Voget's widow, assisted him in assembling the information for this book.

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