Castorologia: Or The History and Traditions of the Canadian Beaver (Google eBook)

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W. Drysdale, 1892 - Beavers - 238 pages
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Page 8 - SHOULD you ask me, whence these stories ? Whence these legends and traditions, With the odors of the forest, With the dew and damp of meadows, With the curling smoke of wigwams, With the rushing of great rivers, With their frequent repetitions, And their wild reverberations, As of thunder in the mountains...
Page 8 - Should you ask where Nawadaha Found these songs so wild and wayward, Found these legends and traditions, I should answer, I should tell you, "In the...
Page 88 - A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings and suffocations are the most dangerous in the body; and it is not much otherwise in the mind; you may take sarza to open the liver, steel to open the spleen, flower of sulphur for the lungs, castoreum for the brain; but no receipt openeth the heart but a true friend, to whom you may impart griefs, joys, fears, hopes, suspicions,...
Page 202 - And they painted on the grave-posts, On the graves yet unforgotten, Each his own ancestral Totem, Each the symbol of his household; Figures of the Bear and Reindeer, Of the Turtle, Crane, and Beaver...
Page 225 - ... winter, they have not any barks to feed on in that season, except that of such sticks as they cut down in summer, and throw into the water opposite the doors of their houses ; and as they generally eat a great deal, the roots above mentioned constitute a principal part of their food during the winter.
Page 143 - Every intelligent Man saw the poverty that would follow the destruction of the Beaver, but there were no Chiefs to controul it ; all was perfect liberty and equality.
Page 223 - ... to be added to his account of the beaver besides a vocabulary of their language, a code of their laws, and a sketch of their religion, to make it the most complete natural history of that animal which can possibly be offered to the public. There cannot be a greater imposition, or indeed a grosser insult on common understanding, than the wish to make us believe the stories of some of the works ascribed to the beaver...
Page 227 - ... made for that purpose, which is fastened to the end of a long stick. In this kind of hunting, every man has the sole right to all the...
Page 100 - Kent, in free and common soccage, and not in capite or by knight's service ; yielding and paying yearly to us, our heirs and successors, for the same, two elks and two black beavers, whensoever and as often as we, our heirs and successors, shall happen to enter into the said countries, territories and regions hereby granted...
Page 226 - Every man, being furnished with an ice-chisel, lashes it to the end of a small staff about four or five feet long ; he then walks along the edge of the banks, and keeps knocking his chisel against the ice. Those who are acquainted with that kind of work well know by the sound of the ice when they are opposite to any of the beavers

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