The Revolution of Hope (Google eBook)

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Lantern Books, Jan 26, 2011 - Psychology
2 Reviews
  

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Review: The Revolution of Hope: Toward a Humanized Technology

User Review  - Leny Alva - Goodreads

This book ia must read for everyone. Fromm has demonstrated to be for collective psychology what Bach is for music. Wonderful experience opening the pages of this book is like opening a window of a ... Read full review

Review: The Revolution of Hope: Toward a Humanized Technology

User Review  - Isabel - Goodreads

This book ia must read for everyone. Fromm has demonstrated to be for collective psychology what Bach is for music. Wonderful experience opening the pages of this book is like opening a window of a ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The Crossroads
13
Hope
19
2 The Paradox and Nature of Hope
22
3 Faith
25
4 Fortitude
27
5 Resurrection
29
7 The Shattering of Hope
31
Where Are We Now and Where Are We Headed?
36
3 The Need for Frames of Orientation and Devotion
71
4 Survival and Transsurvival Needs
76
5 Humane Experiences
82
6 Values and Norms
94
Steps to the Humanization of Technological Society
100
2 Humanistic Planning
102
3 Activation and Liberation of Energies
105
4 Humanized Consumption
121

2 The Vision of the Dehumanized Society of 2000
38
3 The Present Technological Society
42
What Does It Mean to Be Human?
65
2 The Conditions of Human Existence
68
5 Psychospiritual Renewal
137
Can We Do It?
143
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Psychologist and philosopher Erich Fromm was born in Frankfurt, Germany on March 23, 1900. He received a Ph.D in sociology from the University of Heidelberg in 1922 and finished his psychoanalytical training at the Psychoanalytical Institute in Berlin in 1930. He started his own clinical practice and joined the Frankfurt Institute for Social Research. In 1934, he moved to New York and became a professor at Columbia University. In 1950, he moved to Mexico City and became a professor at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, where he created a psychoanalytic section at the medical school. He retired from there in 1965 and moved to Muralto, Switzerland in 1974. Throughout his life, Fromm maintained a clinical practice and wrote books. His writings were notable for both their social and political commentary and their philosophical and psychological underpinnings. He became known for linking human personality types with socioeconomic and political structures. His most popular book, The Art of Loving, was first published in 1956 and became an international bestseller. He died on March 18, 1980.

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