Feminine Psychology

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1993 - Psychology - 269 pages
2 Reviews
As a psychoanalytic pioneer, Karen Horney questioned some of Freud's formulations of psychosexual development, particularly in relation to women. In this collection of papers, many previously unavailable in English, she brings to the subject of femininity her acute clinical observations and a rigorous testing of both her own hypotheses and those formulated by Freud. The topics she discusses include frigidity, the problem of the monogamous ideal, maternal conflicts, the distrust between the sexes, feminine masochism, and the neurotic need for love. Throughout the book, Dr. Horney draws on her experience as a therapist and at the same time consistently evaluates psychological factors within the context of cultural forces.
  

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Review: Feminine Psychology

User Review  - Kaveh mohammad Ghaffari - Goodreads

i just read it because i was love karen i did not get any significant point in this book Read full review

Review: Feminine Psychology

User Review  - Ellen Mcgrath - Goodreads

oh dear...an unfortunate name for the author but oh so informative; making me face certain demons, generally ruining my week but I expect ultimate good outcomes Read full review

Contents

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
7
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS M
33
THE FLIGHT FROM WOMANHOOD
54
INHIBITED FEMININITY
71
THE PROBLEM OF THE MONOGAMOUS IDEAL
84
PREMENSTRUAL TENSION
99
PROBLEMS OF MARRIAGE
119
THE DREAD OF WOMAN
133
THE DENIAL OF THE VAGINA
147
PSYCHOGENIC FACTORS IN FUNCTIONAL
162
MATERNAL CONFLICTS
175
THE OVERVALUATION OF LOVE
182
THE PROBLEM OF FEMININE MASOCHISM
214
PERSONALITY CHANGES IN FEMALE ADOLESCENTS
234
INDEX
259
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Karen Danielsen Horney was a German-born American psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. Educated at the universities of Freiburg, Gottingen, and Berlin, she practiced in Europe until 1932, when she moved to the United States. Initially, she taught at the New York Psychoanalytic Institute, but with others broke away in 1941 to found the American Institute for Psychoanalysis. Horney took issue with several orthodox Freudian teachings, including the Oedipus complex, the death instinct, and the inferiority of women. She thought that classical psychoanalytic theory overemphasized the biological sources of neuroses. Her own theory of personality stressed the sociological determinants of behavior and viewed the individual as capable of fundamental growth and change.

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