Schubert (Google eBook)

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J. M. Dent & Company, 1905 - Composers - 281 pages
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Page 218 - This music crept by me upon the waters, Allaying both their fury and my passion With its sweet air : thence I have follow'd it, Or it hath drawn me rather.
Page 220 - How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank ! Here will we sit and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears; soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold.
Page 220 - Creep in our ears : soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold : There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins ; Such harmony is in immortal souls ; But whilst this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it. Enter Musicians. Come, ho ! and wake Diana with a hymn : With sweetest touches...
Page 114 - We look before and after, And pine for what is not: Our sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught; Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought.
Page 108 - While Butler, needy wretch, was yet alive, No generous patron would a dinner give ; See him, when starved to death, and turned to dust, Presented with a monumental bust. The poet's fate is here in emblem shown, — He asked for bread, and he received a stone.
Page 75 - Cooper's I have read the Last of the Mohicans, the Spy, the Pilot, and the Pioneers. If you have anything else of his, I entreat you to leave it with Frau von Bogner at the Coffee house.
Page 190 - The doctor was civility itself; he again had recourse to the cupboard, and showed us some treasures which had escaped us before. I again turned the conversation to the ' Rosamunde ' music — he believed that he had at one time possessed a copy or sketch of it all. Might I go into the cupboard and look for myself? Certainly, if I had no objection to being smothered with dust. In I went, and after some search, during which my companion kept the doctor engaged in conversation, I found, at the bottom...
Page 47 - ... but anguish, whose enthusiasm for the beautiful (an inspired feeling at least) threatens to vanish altogether, and then ask yourself if such a condition does not represent a miserable and unhappy man ? ' Meine Ruh' ist bin, mein Herz ist schwer, Ich finde sie nimmer und nimmermchr.
Page 47 - Picture to yourself a man whose health can never be re-established, who from sheer despair makes matters worse instead of better ; picture to yourself, I say, a man whose most brilliant hopes have come to nothing, to whom the happiness of proffered love and friendship is but anguish, whose enthusiasm for the beautiful (an inspired feeling at least) threatens to vanish altogether...
Page 190 - Here is a box,' exclaimed the two monks, who were nearly choked with the dust; ' we have found a box, and a heavy one too.' 'A box,' shouted the blind abbot, who was standing in the outer darkness of the oil-cellar—' a box ? where is it ?' ' Bring it out, bring out the box. Heaven be praised. We have found a treasure. Lift up the box. Pull out the box...

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