Voyage to the North Pole: In the Frigate the Syrene; Including a Physical and Geographical Notice Relative to the Island of Iceland (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Sir R. Phillips and Company, 1819 - Arctic regions - 96 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 82 - In hot-blooded animals, the botal aperture is only to be found in the fœtus, and becomes extinct instantly after the birth. derable time, respiration is as necessary to promote the circulation of their blood as it is in other mammiferous animals ; neither can they dispense with the necessity of coming up to the surface of the water, from time to time, to take breath. i found the stomach of my seal filled with intestinal worms alive, that appeared to me to belong to the genus of ecAinorhyncs.
Page 77 - Voyage to the NORTH POLE, in the Frigate the Syrene; including A PHYSICAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL NOTICE Relative to THE ISLAND OF ICELAND. By the Chevalier de la Poix de Freminville, Lieutenant, Chief of the Brigade of the Marine Cadets, and a Member of several learned Societies. London: Printed for Sir Richard Phillips and Co., Bride-Court, BridgeStreet.
Page 80 - We fixed the position of its southerly point at 64 deg. 54 min. tat. and 12 deg. 48 min. long. W. , The Isle of Enckuysen, generally placed in the charts much too westerly of its real situation, and too near the coast of Iceland, appeared to us to be about four leagues in extent, in the direction of NNE to SSW ; it has just elevation enough not to render the approach dangerous. May 14th, we crossed the Arctic polar circle at 10 deg. 14 min. long. W. May 17th. In the latitude of 72 deg. we noticed,...
Page 91 - ... class of our villagers. In general, they speak Latin pretty well. In the eleventh century, science and literature were successfully cultivated here, while, at the same period, Europe was immersed in the depth of ignorance. Their MSS. composed at a period so remote, treat of astronomy, of physics, of natural history, of morals, and philosophy in general. Sir Joseph Banks, a celebrated naturalist, and worthy companion of Captain Cook, was in Iceland in 1772 ; he brought away 162 valuable MSS. which...
Page 95 - ... and the lapillus; also some species of the trochus, of the meretrix mercatoria ; as also of the common muscle and the sea-urchin, which are very good eating. Insects are no strangers to the climate, notwithstanding its extreme rigour ; but they are few in number, and mostly of the order of diptères, and of the genera culex, típula, syrphus, and bibio of Linnœus. I also met with a new species of the curculio, or weasle ; and a very singular kind of nightbird. There are several of the crustaceous...
Page 80 - At night-fall some of the men gave notice of a shoal, or ridge, a-head ; in fact, the sea, at a little distance in front, seemed to us covered with thousands of birds, of the kind of petrels and seagulls, the vast numbers of which, from their white plumage, resembled at a distance the froth of waves rippling over breakers ; we went about a mile to windward of the pretended shoal, and discovered it to be the floating and half putrid carcase of a dead whale, thus serving for food to an immense multitude...
Page 82 - In proceeding along the borders of the ice, we found it stretching along to the east, after having obliged us to mount up to 75 deg. 28 min. and having, in course, passed by the latitude of Beering Island, the pursuit of which we now discontinued. May 22d, a profound calm surprized us, in sight of an island of ice of considerable length and extent. As long as the calm lasted we were hemmed round with a groupe of cetaceous animals, from twenty-five to thirty feet in length, marked as the genus Delphinus,...
Page 79 - ... afterwards to the NW across the oceanic whirlpools, it appears again at the Ferro Islands, then at Iceland, the most extensive theatre of ignivomous eruptions to be found on the surface of our globe. From Iceland, the chain goes on to join the Isle of Jean Mayen, or Trinity, where it appears to end, after traversing under water a space of more than 260 marine leagues. In advancing more to the north, we find nothing in the character of the lands that presents features of a volcanic soil ; Bear's...
Page 79 - ... or mountain, of a prodigious height, entirely covered with snow ; its summit, which reached far above the clouds, reflected the rays of the rising sun, which tinging it with a beautiful rose-colour, blended insensibly with the whiteness of its flanks, and produced an admirable effect. Our observations enabled us to ascertain this mountain for the jocul of Knapafells, on the point of Wester, to the SE of the island. Being thus assured of our position, we bore away at large, keeping always to the...
Page 93 - ... in heaps in the paths. 2. The bull, or ox, is poor and lean, and the island is but scantily stocked with them. 4. The dog is about the size of our shepherd's dogs, which he pretty much resembles. The ears are straight, but gashed or broken at their extremities ; this is a character peculiar to the Iceland dogs. . 5. The Isatis, or Canis Lagopus of Linnœus, is very common in Iceland.

Bibliographic information