Music Notation: Theory and Technique for Music Notation

Front Cover
Hal Leonard Corporation, 1986 - Music - 207 pages
2 Reviews
(Berklee Methods). Learn the essentials of music notation, from fundamental pitch and rhythm placement to intricate meter and voicing alignments. This book also covers the correct way to subdivide rhythms and notate complex articulations and dynamics. An excellent resource for both written and computer notation software!
  

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Contents

Sound Envelopes and the Notational Grid
9
The Staff
10
Clefs
12
The Bass Clef
13
The Percussion Clef
14
The Alto and Tenor Clefs
15
The Great Staff
16
Homework for Chapter One
17
The Sixteenth Rest
100
The Whole Measure Rest
101
Ties
102
Augmentation Dots
103
Dotted Rests
105
Homework for Chapter Eight
107
Smaller Value Rests
109
Triple Augmentation Dots
110

New Notation for New Sounds
19
Other Moveable C Clefs
20
Hybrid Clefs
21
Fundamental Rhythmic Description
23
Stems
25
Stem Direction
26
The Quarter Rest
27
The Half Rest
28
Percussion and Rhythm Noteheads
29
Homework for Chapter Two
31
Other Percussive Noteheads
33
Fundamental Pitch Description
35
Flats
36
Double Flats
37
Spacing of Noteheads in Regard to Accidentals
38
Application of Accidentals
40
The Logic of Accidentals
42
Courtesy Accidentals
43
Key Changes
44
Homework for Chapter Three
47
Logic of Accidentals
49
Null Key Signatures
50
The Notational Grid Conclusion
51
Measures
52
Barlines
53
Double Barlines
54
The fine Barline
55
Braces and Brackets
56
Homework for Chapter Four
57
Changes of Clef
59
Time Signatures Meter and Tempo
61
Placement of Time Signatures
62
Common Time and Cut Time
63
Changes of Meter
64
Metric Placement of Noteheads and Rests
65
Tempo Markings
66
Changes of Tempo
67
Homework for Chapter Five Section
69
Metrical Rhythm
72
Changing Between Simple Time and Compound Time
74
Rhythmic Subdivision of the Pulse
75
Beams
78
Application of Beams
79
Stem Direction of Beamed Note Groups
80
Beam Slant
81
Homework for Chapter Six
83
Rhythmic Subdivision of the Pulse Continued
85
Primary Beams Specific
86
Secondary Beams Specific
88
Syncopation
89
Borrowed Metric Groupings
91
Homework for Chapter Seven
95
Midway Beaming of Note Groups
97
Beams as Indicators of Phrasing
98
Rhythmic Subdivision of the Pulse Concluded
99
Holds Pauses and Repeats
111
Pauses
112
Fermatas Attending Caesuras
113
Repeat Brackets
114
Repeat Endings
115
Single Measure Repeats
117
Double Measure Repeats
118
Da Capo and Dal Segno
119
al fine and al Coda
120
Homework for Chapter Nine
123
Fermatas Attending Barlines
125
Tacet
126
Single Pulse Repeats
127
Col
128
Chords Voicings and Divisi Parts
129
Parenthetical Tensions
130
Voicings
132
Alignment of Accidentals
134
Divisi Parts
136
Homework for Chapter Ten
139
Hybrid Chords and Polychords
141
Coll 8va and Coll 8vb
144
Dynamics
145
Dynamic Level Markings
147
Dynamic Terminology
148
Wedges
150
Homework for Chapter Eleven
151
Location of Dynamics Specific
153
Combined Dynamic Level Markings
154
Articulation
155
Staccato Marks
156
Placement of Accent Staccato and Legato Markings
157
Slurs
158
Breath Marks
160
Idiomatic Considerations
162
Homework for Chapter Twelve
163
Combining Accents with Staccato and Legato Markings
165
Combining Accent Terms with Dynamics
167
Ornaments
169
The Portamento
170
The Glissando
171
Trills
172
The Unmeasured Tremolo
173
The Measured Tremolo
174
Grace Notes
175
Arpeggios
178
Turns
179
Homework for Chapter Thirteen
181
Cues
183
Names of Instruments and Voices with Abbreviations
185
Score Layout
189
Instrumental Transpositions
195
Glossary of European Musical Terms
199
Copyright

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Page 5 - This text is designed to provide the reader with an understanding of the theory of music notation as well as the necessary technique for drawing each notational symbol. The precepts and conventions contained herein, represent the most generally accepted notational practices. These notational "rules" have often been highlighted in bold-face type so that they may be more easily referenced.

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