Annals of the Bodleian Library, Oxford, A. D. 1598-A. D. 1867: with a preliminary notice of the earlier library founded in the fourteenth century (Google eBook)

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Rivingtons, 1868 - Academic libraries - 369 pages
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Page 70 - Oppress'd with numbers in th' unequal field, His men discourag'd, and himself expell'd, Let him for succour sue from place to place, Torn from his subjects, and his son's embrace. First let him see his friends in battle slain, And their untimely fate lament in vain: And when, at length, the cruel war shall cease, On hard conditions may he buy his peace: Nor let him then enjoy supreme command; But fall, untimely, by some hostile hand, And lie unbury'd on the barren sand!
Page 66 - I hear new news every day, and those ordinary rumours of war, plagues, fires, inundations, thefts, murders, massacres, meteors, comets, spectrums...
Page 70 - Yet let a race untam'd, and haughty foes, His peaceful entrance with dire arms oppose: Oppress'd with numbers in th' unequal field, His men discourag'd, and himself expell'd, Let him for succour sue from place to place, Torn from his subjects, and his son's embrace. First let him see his friends in battle slain, And their untimely fate lament in vain: And when, at length...
Page 70 - Charles seem'd concerned at this accident, and that the Lord Falkland observing it, would likewise try his own fortune in the same manner; hoping he might fall upon some passage that could have no relation to his case, and thereby divert the King's thoughts from any impression the other might have upon him.
Page 70 - Virgil, nobly printed, and exquisitely bound. The Lord Falkland, to divert the King, would have his majesty make a trial of his fortune by the Sortcs Virgdiarue, which every body knows was an usual kind of augury some ages past.
Page 27 - Thomas was not present. There it was that the royal pun was made that the founder's name should have ,been Godly and not Bodley. King James handled certain old manuscripts with the familiarity of a scholar, and is reported to have said, I doubt not with perfect sincerity, that were he not King James he would be an University man, and that were it his fate at any time to be a captive, he would wish to be shut up in the Bodleian and to be bound with its chains, consuming his days amongst its books...
Page 12 - Corporis Christi, et Magister Wright, ad vendenda subsellia librorum in publica Academiae bibliotheca, ipsius Universitatis nomine." The books of the public library had all disappeared; what need then to retain the shelves and stalls, when no one thought of replacing their contents, and when the University could turn an honest penny by their sale ? And so the venerabiles viri made a timber-yard of Duke Humphrey's treasurehouse.
Page 66 - Now come tidings of weddings, maskings, mummeries, entertainments, jubilees, embassies, tilts and tournaments, trophies, triumphs, revels, sports, plays : then again, as in a new shifted scene, treasons, cheating tricks, robberies, enormous villanies in all kinds, funerals, burials, deaths of princes, new discoveries, expeditions, now comical, then tragical matters.
Page 14 - I concluded at the last to set up my staff at the library door in Oxon, being thoroughly persuaded, that in my solitude and surcease from the commonwealth affairs, I could not busy myself to better purpose, than by reducing that place (which then in every part lay ruined and waste) to the public use of students.
Page 43 - In brief, acquit thee bravely ; play the man. Look not on pleasures as they come, but go. Defer not the least virtue : life's poor span Make not an ell, by trifling in thy woe. If thou do ill, the joy fades, not the pains : If well, the pain doth fade, the joy remains.

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