A compendium of classical literature: comprising choice extracts translated from Greek and Roman writers, with biographical sketches (Google eBook)

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Biddle, 1861 - Computers - 622 pages
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Page 517 - Therefore we are always confident, knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the LORD : (for we walk by faith, not by sight :) we are confident, I say, and willing rather to be absent from the body, and to be present with the LORD.
Page 68 - Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No! men, high-minded men, With powers as far above dull brutes endued In forest, brake, or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude ; Men, who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain, Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain : These constitute a State, And sovereign Law, that State's collected will O'er thrones and globes elate, Sits Empress, crowning good, repressing ill.
Page 462 - The well-inform'd philosopher Rejoices with a wholesome fear, And hopes in spite of pain ; If Winter bellow from the north, Soon the sweet Spring comes dancing forth, And Nature laughs again. What if thine Heaven be overcast, The dark appearance will not last ; Expect a brighter sky. The God that strings the silver bow Awakes sometimes the muses too, And lays his arrows by.
Page 430 - The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them. And the cow and the bear shall feed; their young ones shall lie down together: and the lion shall eat straw like the ox. And the sucking child shall play on the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put his hand on the cockatrice
Page 35 - Yet, while my Hector still survives, I see My father, mother, brethren, all in thee : Alas ! my parents, brothers, kindred, all Once more will perish, if my Hector fall. Thy wife, thy infant, in thy danger share : Oh ! prove a husband's and a father's care! That quarter most the skilful Greeks annoy, Where yon wild fig-trees join the wall of Troy : Thou from this tower defend th...
Page 518 - And the nations of them which are saved shall walk in the light of it : and the kings of the earth do bring their glory and honour into it.
Page 495 - The groaning-chair began to crawl, Like a huge snail, along the wall; There stuck aloft in public view, And, with small change, a pulpit grew. The porringers, that in a row Hung high, and made a glittering show, To a less noble substance chang'd, Were now but leathern buckets rang'd.
Page 495 - Tis now no kettle, but a bell. A wooden jack, which had almost Lost by disuse the art to roast, A sudden alteration feels, Increased by new intestine wheels ; And, what exalts the wonder more, The number made the motion slower.
Page 491 - The shape of him who suffer'd in the storm, And send it flitting to the Trachin court, The wreck of wretched Ceyx to report : Before his queen bid the pale spectre stand, Who begs a vain relief at Juno's hand.
Page 544 - God, binding themselves by a solemn oath, not for the purposes of any wicked design, but never to commit any fraud, theft, or adultery, never to falsify their word, nor deny a trust when they should be called upon to deliver it up; after which it was their custom to separate and then reassemble to eat in common a harmless meal.

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