American Passages: A History of the United States

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Cengage Learning, Oct 1, 2008 - History - 1056 pages
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With a unique attention to time as the defining nature of history, AMERICAN PASSAGES offers students a view of American history as a complete, compelling narrative. AMERICAN PASSAGES emphasizes the intertwined nature of three key characteristics of time—s
  

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Contents

PASSAGES Prehistory to 1763
2
Contact Conflict and Exchange in the Atlantic World to 1590
6
PICTURING THE PAST Great Serpent Mound
9
Great Serpent Mound
10
Columbus Sails West 14921493
19
Three Views of EuropeanNative American
20
Colonization of North America 15901675
34
DOING HISTORY Reports from Early Virginia
44
DOING HISTORY Women and War
404
Confederate Ships Under Construction
408
2 Campaigns in the West in 1862
411
4 Campaigns in Virginia and Maryland
418
Missionaries at Port Royal
419
Blood and Freedom 18631865
424
1 Vicksburg AprilJuly 1863
429
The Gettysburg Address November 19 1863
432

Canadian Women at Work
48
Pequot War Diagram
54
English Colonization After 1660
58
Crisis and Change 16751720
62
A Quaker Woman Preaching
65
William Penns Holy Experiment
70
Wars and Rivalry for North America
76
The Deerfield Raid of 1704
80
Carolina
87
Maryland Planters House
88
The Expansion of Colonial British America 17201763
92
PICTURING THE PAST Education and Gender
95
Cultural Diversity and Expansion
101
Slave Resistance
106
to 1814
122
The British Colonies Resist Imperial Reform
129
Opposing Views of the Stamp Act
132
Crisis in Boston
135
The Second Continental Congress
141
Abigail Adams
142
Continental Currency
152
Toward a More Perfect Union
160
PICTURING THE PAST Pennsylvania Abolition Society Broadside
166
Religious Liberty
168
4 Ratification of the Constitution
186
The Federalist Republic
190
George Washington in New York City
192
Opposing Visions of America
196
Expansion and Conflict in the West
202
1 Conflict in the Northwest Territory
205
Controversy over the Sedition Act of 1798
214
The New Republic Faces a New Century
218
Tenskwatawa the Shawnee Prophet
223
PICTURING THE PAST The African Episcopal Church of St Thomas
225
1 The Election of 1800
228
The Lewis and Clark Expedition 18041806
235
Native Americans and the New Republic
242
3 The War of 1812
244
to 1855
250
PICTURING THE PAST Expanding Borders
256
The Future of Native Americans Building
258
PICTURING THE PAST Steamboat Popularity
262
3 Migration Patterns in the Old Southwest
264
The Years of Andrew Jackson
268
6 The Missouri Compromise 1820
272
The Years of Andrew Jackson 18291836
280
What Slavery Means
286
The Crisis of Slavery in Virginia 18311832
287
The Bank of the United States as a Monster
290
1 Removal of the Native Americans
293
Panic and Boom 18371845
308
1 The Growth of Railroads to 1860
311
Paths of the Slave Trade
313
Reform Takes Root
317
Religion and Reform
318
The Dangers of Drink
319
3 The Election of 1840
327
Expansion and Reaction 18461854
336
1 War with Mexico 18461848
338
The Battle of Cerro Gordo
339
Americans on the Move
342
The Quest for Perfection
348
4 The Compromise of 1850
355
Minstrelsy
357
5 KansasNebraska and Slavery 1854
361
to 1877
366
PICTURING THE PAST AYeoman Farm
372
White Southerners Without Slaves
374
1 The Election of 1856
378
Dred Scott 1857
379
The Panic of 1857
381
2 The Election of 1860
387
14
393
Descent into War 18611862
394
1 Southern Secession 18601861
396
Confederate Nationalism
400
Freedoms Promise
434
3 Grant Against Lee in Virginia
438
The Copperheads
441
6 The Territory of War
445
Its Rise and Fall 18651877
450
1 Sharecropping in the South by County
451
From Johnson to Grant 18671868
456
A Cartoonist Attacks the Ku Klux Klan
461
2 Indian Reservations in the West
463
Women in the 1870s
465
Womens Rights and Black Suffrage During
466
The War Against Drink
468
3 Reconstruction in the South
475
to 1909
482
Big Business Arrives
491
The Knights of Labor
496
Farming on the Great Plains
503
The Harshness of Farm Life
504
Debating the Protective Tariff
512
Urban Growth and Farm Protest 18871893
516
The Diminishing Rights of Minority Groups
523
A Troubled Nation Expands Outward 18931901
544
Foreign Policy Challenges
555
Theodore Roosevelt and Progressive Reform 19011909
574
PICTURING THE PAST W E B Du Bois and the Struggle for African American
583
to 1933
602
The Struggle Between Roosevelt and Taft
618
vii
621
The Impact of World War I 19141921
638
The Persistence of Reform
645
A Nation at War
651
The Age of Jazz and Mass Culture 19211927
670
New Roles for Women
691
The Great Depression
692
The Great Depression 19271933
698
PICTURING THE PAST Unemployment During the Great Depression
705
to 1960
722
Economic Recovery Spring 1933
730
New Deal Diplomacy 19331934
736
The Second Term 19371940
751
The Second World War 19391945
758
The Home Front
764
Internment of Japanese Americans
771
Postwar America 19461952
790
The Soviet Threat
797
The Cold War Intensifies 19491953
804
The Eisenhower Years 19531960
816
The Civil Rights Movement 19541955
822
The Rise of Elvis
831
A Second Term 19571960
837
to 2008
846
Social and Political Challenges 1962
854
PICTURING THE PAST Voters as Consumers in a New Television World
864
Conclusion
881
Crisis of Confidence 19691980
884
Activism Rights and Reform
889
Exit from Vietnam
900
From Reagan to Clinton 19811995
918
Social Tensions of the 1980s
924
The Road to Understanding
931
An Angry Nation
939
PICTURING THE PAST The Republican Revolution of 1994
945
A Conservative Nation in a Globalizing World 19952008
948
PICTURING THE PAST Hispanics Enter Politics
951
Clinton Impeached and Acquitted
959
The Erosion of the Bush Presidency
966
FLASHPOINTS
972
MAPS
1004
APPENDIX
1
1 The Arrival of the First Americans 8
8
The Atlantic Slave Trade 18
18
4 European Explorations 14921542 22
22
564
33
Rituals of Conquest in New Mexico 37
37
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Edward L. Ayers is the President of the University of Richmond. He was educated at the University of Tennessee and Yale University, where he received his Ph.D. in American Studies. Previously Dean of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia, where he began teaching in 1980, Ayers was named National Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation and the Council for the Support of Education in 2003. His book, IN THE PRESENCE OF MINE ENEMIES: WAR IN THE HEART OF AMERICA, 1859-1863 (2003), won the Bancroft Prize for distinguished work on the history of the United States. THE PROMISE OF THE NEW SOUTH: LIFE AFTER RECONSTRUCTION (1992) won prizes for the best book on the history of American race relations and on the history of the American South. It was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. He is the co-editor of THE OXFORD BOOK OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH (1997) and ALL OVER THE MAP: RETHINKING AMERICAN REGIONS (1996). The World Wide Web version of "The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War" was recognized by the American Historical Association as the best aid to the teaching of history. His latest book is WHAT CAUSED THE CIVIL WAR? REFLECTIONS ON THE SOUTH AND SOUTHERN HISTORY (2005).

Lewis L. Gould is Eugene C. Barker Centennial Professor Emeritus in American History at the University of Texas at Austin. After receiving his Ph.D. from Yale University, he taught at Texas for 31 years before his retirement in 1998. He was honored for outstanding undergraduate and graduate teaching during his career. His most recent books include THE MODERN AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (2003), GRAND OLD PARTY: A HISTORY OF THE REPUBLICANS (2003), and THE MOST EXCLUSIVE CLUB: A HISTORY OF THE MODERN UNITED STATES SENATE (2005). He has written op-ed essays for "The Washington Post," the "Austin American-Statesman," and "The Dallas Morning News," and has been a frequent commentator on radio and television about modern politics, First Ladies, and Congress.

He is also an associate editor of the American National Biography. Oshinsky writes about the brutality of penitentiary life in his book, Worse Than Slavery: Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice. He earned a Senior Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities and an appointment as Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Texas, Austin for his work on the penitentiary project. Oshinsky also received the 17th Annual Robert F. Kennedy Book Award for his novel.

Jean R. Soderlund is Professor of History and Deputy Provost for Faculty Affairs at Lehigh University. She received her Ph.D. from Temple University and was a post-doctoral fellow at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Her book, QUAKERS AND SLAVERY: A DIVIDED SPIRIT, won the Alfred E. Driscoll Publication Prize of the New Jersey Historical Commission. Soderlund was an editor of three volumes of the PAPERS OF WILLIAM PENN (1981-1983) and co-authored FREEDOM BY DEGREES: EMANCIPATION IN PENNSYLVANIA AND ITS AFTERMATH (1991). She has written articles and chapters in books on the history of women, African Americans, Native Americans, Quakers, and the development of abolition in the British North American colonies and early United States. She is currently working on a study of the Lenape people within colonial New Jersey society. She is a council member of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, and she served as a committee chair for the American Historical Association and the Organization of American Historians.

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