Journal of the Franklin Institute (Google eBook)

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Pergamon Press, 1883 - Electronic journals
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Vols. 1-69 include more or less complete patent reports of the U. S. Patent Office for years 1825-59.
  

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Page 281 - To a civilized nation of the present day, the applications of science are a necessity ; and our country has hitherto succeeded in this line, only for the reason that there are certain countries in the world where pure science has been and is cultivated, and where the study of nature is considered a noble pursuit. But such countries are rare, and those who wish to pursue pure science in our own country must be prepared to face public opinion in a manner which requires much moral courage. They must...
Page 288 - ... to scientific work; but, if we wish to cultivate this highest class of men in science, we must open a career for them worthy of their efforts. Jenny Lind, with her beautiful voice, would have cultivated it to some extent in her native village; yet who would expect her to travel over the world, and give concerts for nothing? and how would she have been able to do so if she had wished? And so the scientific man, whatever his natural talents, must have instruments and a...
Page 285 - But there is an old saying, that where there is a will there is a way. Few professors do as much teaching or lecturing as the German professors, who are also noted for their elaborate papers in the scientific journals. I myself have been burdened down with work, and know what it is; and yet I here assert that all can find time for scientific research if they desire...
Page 280 - Should we stop its progress, and attend only to its applications, we should soon degenerate into a people like the Chinese, who have made no progress for generations, because they have been satisfied with the applications of science, and have never sought for reasons in what they have done. The reasons constitute pure science. They have known the application of gunpowder for centuries; and yet the reasons for its peculiar action, if sought in the proper manner, would have developed the science of...
Page 222 - ... all penalties prescribed by the revenue laws shall be applied and enforced against such articles and against the persons who may be guilty of such withdrawal or sale.
Page 296 - This might be true for a man on a desert island, whose error would influence only himself. But when he opens his lips to instruct others, or even when he signifies his opinions by his daily life, then he is directly responsible for all his errors of judgment or fact. He has no right to think a molehill as big as a mountain, nor to. teach it, any more than he has to think the world flat, and teach that it is so. The facts and laws of our science have not equal importance, neither have the men who...
Page 298 - The science of physics, in whose applications our country glories, is to arise among us, and make us respected by the nations of the world. Such a prophecy may seem rash with regard to a nation which does not yet do enough physical work to support a physical journal. But we know the speed with which we advance in this country : we see cities springing up in a night, and other wonders performed at an unprecedented rate. And now we see physical laboratories being built, we see a great demand for thoroughly...
Page 287 - According to the figures, only sixteen colleges and universities have $500,000 or over of invested funds, and only one-half of these have $1,000,000 and over. Now, even the latter sum is a very small endowment for a college; and to call any institution a university which has less than $1,000,000 is to render it absurd in the face of the world. And yet more than 100 of our institutions, many of them very respectable colleges, have abused the word " university
Page 286 - I note one institution with over 500 students which is known to me personally as of the grade of a high school. The statistics are more or less defective, and it would much weaken the force of my remarks if I went too much into detail. I append the following tables, however, of 330 so-called colleges and universities : 218 had from 0 to 100 students. 88 " " 100 " 200 " 12 " " 200 " 300 " 6 " " 300 " 500 " 6 over 500 Of 322 so-called colleges and universities: 206 had 0 to 10 in the faculty....
Page 129 - If we admit the assumption of electric currents around each molecule, the molecule itself would then be electromagnetic, and the question still remains, What is polarity? Have the supposed electric currents separated the two assumed magnetic fluids contained in the molecule, as in Poisson's theory ? or are the electric currents themselves magnetic, independent of the iron molecule ? In order to produce the supposed heterogeneous arrangement of...

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