The Alexandrian Riots of 38 C.E. and the Persecution of the Jews: A Historical Reconstruction

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BRILL, 2009 - History - 336 pages
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Scholars have read the Alexandrian riots of 38 CE according to intertwined dichotomies. The Alexandrian Jews fought to keep their citizenship - or to acquire it; they evaded the payment of the poll-tax - or prevented any attempts to impose it on them; they safeguarded their identity against the Greeks - or against the Egyptians. Avoiding that pattern and building on the historical reconstruction of the experience of the Alexandrian Jewish community under the Ptolemies, this work submits that the riots were the legal and political consequence of an imperial adjudication against the Jews. Most of the Jews lost their residence never to recover it again. The Roman emperor, the Roman prefect of Egypt and the Alexandrian citizenry - all shared responsibilities according to their respective and expected roles.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Unwrapping Philos Narrative
13
The Rights of Residence of Alexandrian Jews in the Ptolemaic Period
23
The Rights of Residence of Alexandrian Jews in the Roman Period
57
The Prefecture of Flaccus The Early Years
77
The Precedent for the Riots
87
Spring 38 CE
137
Agrippa in Alexandria
151
The Chronology
255
The Replacement of the Prefect of Egypt at the Emperors Death
273
The Prefects Jurisdiction over Matters of Status
277
The Topography of Alexandria
282
Ethnics Patris and the Case of Alexandreus
287
Bibliography
293
General Index
315
Index of Documentary Sources
322

The Riots of 38 CE
167
The Cultural and Religious Background of the Riots
195
The Years 39 and 41 CE
213
Conclusions
239

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About the author (2009)

Sandra Gambetti, Ph.D. (2003) in Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of California, Berkeley, is Assistant Professor of History at the College of Staten Island CUNY. This is her first monograph.

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