Nancy Drew 02: The Hidden Staircase (Google eBook)

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Penguin, May 1, 1930 - Juvenile Fiction - 192 pages
38 Reviews
More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA
  

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Review: The Hidden Staircase (Nancy Drew #2)

User Review  - Asif Zamir - Goodreads

It is the second volume in the series. Nancy is originally asked by her friend Helen to help solve the mystery of Twin Elms. This is the home of Helen's great great Grandmother Mrs. Flora Turnbull and ... Read full review

Review: The Hidden Staircase (Nancy Drew #2)

User Review  - Radhika - Goodreads

March 8 2014 Nancy Drew was vey interesting because there were two mysteries happening and i don't know how Nancy could get two of them down and solve them. The first one was about Nancy's friend ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
10
III
21
IV
30
V
37
VI
46
VII
55
VIII
63
XII
101
XIII
109
XIV
119
XV
128
XVI
137
XVII
145
XVIII
154
XIX
164

IX
72
X
82
XI
92
XX
171
Copyright

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About the author (1930)

Carolyn Keene was the pseudonym that Mildred Wirt Benson and Walter Karig used to write Nancy Drew books. The idea of Nancy Drew came from Edward Stratemeyer in 1929. He also had other series, that included the Hardy Boys, but he died in 1930 before the Nancy Drew series became famous. His daughters, Harriet and Edna, inherited his company and maintained Nancy Drew having Mildred Wirt Benson, the original Carolyn Keene, as the principal ghostwriter. During the Depression, they asked Benson to take a pay cut and she refused, which is when Karig wrote the books. Karig's Nancy Drew books were Nancy's Mysterious Letter, The Sign of the Twisted Candles, and Password to Larkspur Lane. He was fired from writing more books because of his refusal to honor the request that he keep his work as Carolyn Keene a secret. He allowed the Library of Congress to learn of his authorship and his name appeared on their catalog cards. Afterwards, they rehired Benson and she wrote until her last Nancy Drew book (#30) was written in 1953, Clue of the Velvet Mask. Harriet and Edna Stratemeyer also contributed to the Nancy Drew series. Edna wrote plot outlines for several of the early books and Harriet, who claimed to be the sole author, had actually outlined and edited nearly all the volumes written by Benson. The Stratemeyer Syndicate had begun to make its writers sign contracts that prohibited them from claiming any credit for their works, but Benson never denied her writing books for the series. After Harriet's death in 1982, Simon and Schuster became the owners of the Stratemeyer Syndicate properties and in 1994, publicly recognized Benson for her work at a Nancy Drew conference at her alma mater, the University of Iowa. Now, Nancy Drew has several ghostwriters and artists that have contributed to her more recent incarnations.

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