The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life

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Doubleday, 1959 - Psychology - 255 pages
30 Reviews
A notable contribution to our understanding of ourselves, explores the realm of human behavior in social situations and the way that we appear to others. Dr. Goffman uses the metaphor of theatrical performance as framework Each person in everyday social intercourse presents himself and his activity to others , attempts to guide and control the impressions they form of him and employs certain techniques in order to sustain his performance, just as an actor presents a character to an audience. The discussions of these social techniques offered here are based upon detailed research and observation of social customs in many regions.

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AweXome for assignment writing. <3 Goffman.

Review: The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life

User Review  - Oleg Kagan - Goodreads

I may be ignorant, but it seems to me that The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life was the very first book to propose, in social science at the very least, the examination of behavior using the ... Read full review

Contents

II
17
III
77
IV
106
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About the author (1959)

Erving Goffman, an American sociologist, received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He is known for his distinctive method of research and writing. He was concerned with defining and uncovering the rules that govern social behavior down to the minutest details. He contributed to interactionist theory by developing what he called the "dramaturgical approach," according to which behavior is seen as a series of mini-dramas. Goffman studied social interaction by observing it himself---no questionnaires, no research assistants, no experiments. The title of his first book, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life (1959), became one of the themes of all of his subsequent research. He also observed and wrote about the social environment in which people live, as in his Total Institutions. He taught his version of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania; he died in 1983, the year in which he served as president of the American Sociological Association.

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