The Love Letters of Mary, Queen of Scots, to James, Earl of Bothwell, with Her Love Sonnets and Marriage Contracts (Google eBook)

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1825
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Page 220 - I do believe the principal part of her disease to consist of a deep grief and sorrow. Nor does it seem possible to make her forget the same. Still she repeats these words,
Page iii - An English Whig, who asserts the reality of the popish plot, an Irish Catholic, who denies the massacre in 1641, and a Scotch Jacobite, who maintains the innocence of Queen Mary, must be considered as men beyond the reach of argument or reason, and must be left to their prejudices.
Page 52 - Good. ii. 252. They assembled accordingly, at Hampton Court, December 14. and 15. 1568 ; and, " The originals of the letters supposed to be written with the* Queen of Scots' own hand, were then also presently produced and perused ; and, being read, were duly conferred and compared, for the manner of writing, and fashion of orthography, with sundry other letters long since heretofore written, and sent by the said Queen of Scots to the Queen's Majesty. In collation whereof no difference was found.
Page 56 - Qu'issir en peut. Car je n'ay autre envie Que de ma foy luy faire appercevoir, Que pour tempeste ou bonasse qu'il face, Jamais ne veut changer demeure ou place. Bref, je feray de ma foy telle preuve, Qu'il cognoistra, sans faute, ma constance, Non par mes pleurs, ou feinte obéissance t Comme autres font, mais par diverse espreuve.
Page 51 - I am sick, I will differ, as touching the matter it is too late. It was not long of me that you have not thought thereupon in time; and if you had not more changed your mind since mine absence than I have, you should not be now to ask such resolving. Well there wanteth nothing of my part; and seeing that your negligence doth put us both in the danger of a false brother, if it succeed not well, I will never rise again.
Page 226 - ... she took, nor could her conduct have been more repugnant to all the maxims of prudence and of decency. The positive evidence produced against Mary may be classed under two heads.
Page 99 - ... made haste to assemble forces ; and notwithstanding that his army was inferior in number to that of the Queen of Scots, he took the field against her.
Page 332 - Lords of that-party, encouraged by his countenance, had taken possession of the capital, and carried on a vigorous war against the Regent. By a sudden and unexpected inroad, they seized that nobleman at Stirling ; but finding that his friends, sallying from the Castle, were likely to rescue him, they instantly put him to death. The Earl of Marre was chosen Regent in his room ; and found the same difficulties in the government of that divided country. He was therefore glad to accept of the mediation...
Page 299 - English court for the examination of this great cause, were the duke of Norfolk the earl of Sussex, and Sir Ralph Sadler ; and York was named as the place of conference.
Page 63 - I charge you to carry this most instant thought, that I cannot balance in any weight of my judgment the value that I prize you at, and suppose no treasure can countervail such a faith.

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