A History of the People of the United States, from the Revolution to the Civil War, Volume 7 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
London, 1910 - United States
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Contents

Exemption acts 46
46
Of Congress in 1843 7273
48
Disorder in the House 52
53
Occupations of the people 73 74
55
A tariff bill reported
59
The streets and shops 76
78
Population of Southern cities
85
Literature
91
Painters and sculptors
98
Rapidity of land travel
102
Letter mail companies
109
Suits against letter mail companies 116118
116
Circulation 122
122
Congress and the telegraph
129
Vetoed by Tyler 60
130
Doctrine of the Second Advent
136
CHAPTER LXXIV
142
Calhoun on occupation 293 294
143
Question debated in Pennsylvania
149
Lettering and flogging
151
Public schools in Connecticut 157
157
New Constitutions made
163
Last reduction under tariff of 1833 60
165
The Peoples Convention 168
169
Tammany Hall supports Dorr
175
And approved by Congress
181
Antirent riots 187
187
THE WEST IN THE FOUTIES
190
Milwaukee
197
Removal of the Indians 202
203
Nauvoo chartered
209
The Mormon war
215
Emigration from the Old World
221
The Germans in the West
226
Stagecoaching in Georgia
232
Slave quarters
238
Separation of families 243244
244
Seward on rendition 250
251
Jonathan Walker branded
253
Treatment of free negroes
259
Slavery as seen by travellers 265 266
265
Ill feeling toward Great Britain
271
The Caroline affair adjusted
277
Webster defends his course 284
284
Emigration to Oregon 1842 287
291
Oregon settlement meetings 294
294
Popular interest in Oregon 300
300
Failure and excitement in our country
306
Congressmen declare Texas is to be annexed 312
312
S P Andrews sees Aberdeen
318
Pakenham on British policy in Texas
324
Clays Alabama Letters 368
369
Nativism in Philadelphia
375
The Bible in the schools
381
Election frauds 387
387
Browns amendment
394
Expediency of annexation
400
Polks Inaugural speech 406
406
Lord Aberdeen on Oregon
408
Pakenham offers arbitration
414
Pakenham offers arbitration
420
The desert 426
426
Fear of invasion of Texas
432
Polk offers money to Paredes
439
Mexicans attack Thornton
441
Mackenzie sent to Santa Anna
447
Capture of Monterey 453
454
Map of Buena Vista
458
Polks policy toward California 464
464
Stockton in command
470
Polk defends his Mexican policy
473
The Three Million Bill
480
Calhoun on the proviso 484
486
Hunkers and Barnburners 493
493
Shall territory be acquired?
499
CHAPTER LXXXII
506
Map of march to Mexico
509
Battle of Contreras 514515
515
Chapultepec 521
521
Shall slavery be admitted into Oregon?
528
The House Oregon bill passed
534
Native Americans prefer Taylor
541
Whigs nominate Taylor and Fillmore
547
Central America offers Nicaragua route
553
Quarrel of Great Britain with Nicaragua 559
559
Polk urges occupation of Yucatan 563
563
The Hise treaty with Nicaragua
569
Bulwer sent to Washington
575
Report to Congress on the scheme
581
The diggings
587
The news spreads
588
Of a party across Mexico 594
594
Gathering of the overland emigrants 600
600
Relief sent to belated ones 605
605
State government inaugurated
611
Apportionment Act 6768
615
Excitement in England 407
616
Liberty League formed 537 538
619
Linns Bill debated 289292
631
Clay questioned 366
638
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 351 - Resolved, That our title to the whole of the territory of Oregon is clear and unquestionable; that no portion of the same ought to be ceded to England or any other power; and that the re-occupation of Oregon and the re-annexation of Texas at the earliest practicable period are great American measures, which this convention recommends to the cordial support of the Democracy of the Union.
Page 446 - Provided, That as an express and fundamental condition to, the acquisition of any territory from the Republic of Mexico by the United States, by virtue of any treaty which may be negotiated between them, and to the use by the Executive of the moneys herein appropriated, neither Slavery nor involuntary servitude shall ever exist in any part of said territory, except for crime, whereof the party shall first be duly convicted.
Page 414 - Existing rights of every European nation should be respected, but it is due alike to our safety and our interests that the efficient protection of our laws should be extended over our whole territorial limits, and that it should be distinctly announced to the world as our settled policy that no future European colony or dominion shall with our consent be planted or established on any part of the North American continent.
Page 393 - The inhabitants of the ceded territory shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States and admitted as soon as possible according to the principles of the federal Constitution to the enjoyment of all the rights, advantages and immunities of citizens of the United States, and in the mean time they shall be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property and the Religion which they profess.
Page 573 - ... occupy, or fortify or colonize, or assume, or exercise any dominion over Nicaragua, Costa Rica, the Mosquito coast, or any part of Central America...
Page 439 - The cup of forbearance had been exhausted, even before the recent information from the frontier of the Del Norte. But now, after reiterated menaces, Mexico has passed the boundary of the United States, has invaded our territory, and shed American blood upon the American soil.
Page 545 - Congress has no more power to make a slave than to make a king : no more power to institute or establish slavery than to institute or establish...
Page 470 - The war has been represented as unjust and unnecessary, and as one of aggression on our part upon a weak and injured enemy. Such erroneous views, though entertained but by few, have been widely and extensively circulated, not only at home, but have been spread throughout Mexico and the whole world. A more effectual means...
Page 573 - America ; nor will either make use of any protection which either affords or may afford, or any alliance which either has or may have to or with any state or people, for the purpose of erecting or maintaining any such fortifications, or of occupying, fortifying, or colonizing Nicaragua, Costa Rica, the Mosquito coast, or any part of Central America, or of assuming or exercising dominion over the same...
Page 237 - Ran away, a negro woman and two children; a few days before she went off, I burnt her with a hot iron, on the left side of her face. I tried to make the letter M.

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