The Discovery of France

Front Cover
Pan Macmillan, Feb 23, 2011 - History - 400 pages
40 Reviews

Illuminating, engrossing and full of surprises, The Discovery of France is a literary exploration of a country few will recognize; from maps and migration to magic, language and landscape, it’s a book that reveals the ‘real’ past of France to tell the whole story – and history – of this remarkable nation.

‘With gloriously apposite facts and an abundance of quirky anecdotes and thumbnail sketches of people, places and customs, Robb, on brilliant form, takes us on a stunning journey through the historical landscape of France’ Independent

‘Certain books strain the patience of those close to you. How many times can you demand: “Look at this! Can you imagine? Did you know that?” without actually handing over the volume? This is such a book’ Mail on Sunday

‘An extraordinary journey of discovery that will delight even the most indolent armchair traveller’ Daily Telegraph

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Review: The Discovery of France: A Historical Geography from the Revolution to the First World War

User Review  - David Ball - Goodreads

I love France too, but the somewhat unfocused lack of direction, the superficial treatment of some topics and detail of others, the disconnection between some of the illustrations and the text made ... Read full review

Review: The Discovery of France: A Historical Geography from the Revolution to the First World War

User Review  - Mary Catelli - Goodreads

Did you know that in nineteenth century France, most Frenchmen did not speak French? That Fenimore Cooper visited France and found the roads full as bad as the worst in the United States? (Which meant ... Read full review

About the author (2011)

Graham Robb was born in Manchester in 1958 and is a former Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford. He has published widely in nineteenth-century French literature, including biographies of Balzac, Victor Hugo (winner of the Royal Society of Literature Heinemann and Whitbread Biography awards) and Rimbaud (shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize). He lives in Oxford.

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