Doctor Faustus and Other Plays

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Oxford University Press, 1998 - Drama - 503 pages
12 Reviews
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), a man of extreme passions and a playwright of immense talent, is the most important of Shakespeare's contemporaries. This edition offers his five major plays, which show the radicalism and vitality of his writing in the few years before his violent death.
Tamburlaine Part One and Part Two deal with the rise to world prominence of the great Scythian shepherd-robber; The Jew of Malta is a drama of villainy and revenge; Edward II was to influence Shakespeare's Richard II. Doctor Faustus, perhaps the first drama taken from the medieval legend of a man who sells his soul to the devil, is here in both its A- and its B- text, showing the enormous and fascinating differences between the two.
Under the General Editorship of Dr. Michael Cordner of the University of York, the texts of the plays have been newly edited and are presented with modernized spelling and punctuation. In addition, there is a scholarly introduction and detailed annotation.
  

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Review: Doctor Faustus and Other Plays, Parts 1-2

User Review  - Goodreads

I read this book while in graduate during a time that my ego as an acedemician ruled and drove me. This story should have been awake up call. Read full review

Review: Doctor Faustus and Other Plays, Parts 1-2

User Review  - John W. - Goodreads

Tamburlaine the Great, Part I and Part II. Read before an excellent performance at the Theatre for a new Audience. After the bloody history of Tamburlaine, you appreciate more and more Shakespeare and the variety of his characters and plots. Read full review

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About the author (1998)

David Bevington is Professor of English at the University of Chicago. Eric Rasmussen is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno

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