Malcolm X Speaks: Selected Speeches and Statements

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Grove Press, 1965 - Biography & Autobiography - 226 pages
23 Reviews
These are the major speeches made by Malcolm X during the last tumultuous eight months of his life. In this short period of time, his vision for abolishing racial inequality in the United States underwent a vast transformation. Breaking from the Black Muslims, he moved away from the black militarism prevalent in his earlier years only to be shot down by an assassin's bullet.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - blake.rosser - LibraryThing

Regardless of what I think about Malcolm X the man or the activist, this is an invaluable collection of speeches, interviews, and historical narrative that traces the evolution of his thought in his ... Read full review

Review: Malcolm X Speaks: Selected Speeches and Statements

User Review  - Jack Wolfe - Goodreads

For historical import, this is of course five stars. As a reading experience I'm giving it just four because Malcolm's strengths as an orator don't always translate well to print. The man had a ... Read full review

Contents

A DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
18
THE BLACK REVOLUTION
45
LETTERS FROM ABROAD
58
THE HARLEM HATEGANG SCARE
64
APPEAL TO AFRICAN HEADS OF STATE
72
ATTHEAUDUBON
88
ATTHEAUDUBON
115
TO MISSISSIPPI YOUTH
137
PROSPECTS FOR FREEDOM IN 1965
147
AFTER THE BOMBING
157
CONFRONTATION WITH AN EXPERT
178
LAST ANSWERS AND INTERVIEWS
194
Copyright

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About the author (1965)

Born in Omaha, Nebraska, and the son of a Baptist minister, Malcolm Little grew up with violence. Whites killed several members of his family, including his father. As a youngster, he went to live with a sister in Boston where he started a career of crime that he continued in New York's Harlem as a drug peddler and pimp. While serving a prison term for burglary in 1952, he converted to Islam and undertook an intensive program of study and self-improvement, movingly detailed in "Autobiography of Malcolm X." He wrote constantly to Elijah Muhammad (Elijah Poole, 1897--1975), head of the black separatist Nation of Islam, which already claimed the loyalty of several of his brothers and sisters. Upon release from prison, Little went to Detroit, met with Elijah Muhammad, and dropped the last name Little, adopting X to symbolize the unknown African name his ancestors had been robbed of when they were enslaved. Soon he was actively speaking and organizing as a Muslim minister. In his angry and articulate preaching, he condemned white America for its treatment of blacks, denounced the integration movement as black self-delusion, and advocated black control of black communities. During the turbulent 1960's, he was seen as inflammatory and dangerous. In 1963, a storm broke out when he called President Kennedy's assassination a case of "chickens coming home to roost," meaning that white violence, long directed against blacks, had now turned on itself. The statement was received with fury, and Elijah Muhammad denounced him publicly. Shocked and already disillusioned with the leader because of his reputed involvement with several women, Malcolm X went on a pilgrimage to Mecca and then traveled to several African countries, where he was received as a fellow Muslim. When he returned home, he was bearing a new message: Islam is a religion that welcomes and unites people of all races in the Oneness of Allah. On the night of February 21, 1965, as he was preaching at Harlem's Audubon Ballroom, he was assassinated.

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