The Cambridge Companion to W. B. Yeats

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Marjorie Elizabeth Howes, John Kelly
Cambridge University Press, May 25, 2006 - Literary Criticism - 242 pages
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This accessible and thought-provoking Companion is designed to help students experience the pleasures and challenges offered by one of the twentieth century's greatest poets. A team of international contributors examine Yeats's poetry, drama and prose in their historical and national contexts. The essays explain and synthesise major aspects and themes of his life and work: his lifelong engagement with Ireland, his complicated relationship to the English literary tradition, his literary, social, and political criticism and the evolution of his complex spiritual and religious sense. First-time readers of Yeats as well as more advanced scholars will welcome this comprehensive account of Yeats's career with its useful chronological outline and survey of the most important trends in Yeats scholarship. Taken as a whole, this Companion comprises an essential introduction for students and teachers of Yeats.
  

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Contents

3
36
4
59
5
77
6
101
7
115
8
129
9
144
10
167
11
185

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Page 224 - A woman can be proud and stiff When on love intent ; But Love has pitched his mansion in The place of excrement ; For nothing can be sole or whole That has not been rent.

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About the author (2006)

John Kelly is Professor of English at Oxford University.

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