The modern researcher

Front Cover
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Feb 1, 1992 - Reference - 409 pages
9 Reviews
A section on computers is included in this edition of the classic manual on all aspects of research and writing

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Review: The Modern Researcher (with Infotrac) [With Infotrac]

User Review  - Laurie - Goodreads

Just remembering my arranged marriage with this book in 1987 brought on the olfactory memory of card catalogs, bound periodical indexes, sour-faced university librarians, and the chalk-dusted ... Read full review

Review: The Modern Researcher (with Infotrac) [With Infotrac]

User Review  - Laurie Neighbors - Goodreads

Just remembering my arranged marriage with this book in 1987 brought on the olfactory memory of card catalogs, bound periodical indexes, sour-faced university librarians, and the chalk-dusted ... Read full review

Contents

Characteristics
3
List of Figures 1 History as Visual Symbols and Associations
11
The ABC of Technique
14
Copyright

49 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1992)

Born in France in 1907, Jacques Barzun came to the United States in 1920. After graduating from Columbia College, he joined the faculty of the university, becoming Seth Low Professor of History and, for a decade, Dean of Faculties and Provost. The author of some thirty books, including the "New York Times" bestseller "From Dawn to Decadence, " he received the Gold Medal for Criticism from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, of which he was twice president. He lives in San Antonio, Texas.

Henry F. Graff is a professional emeritus of history at Columbia University, where he taught his pioneering seminar on the presidency. The author of "The Tuesday Cabinet" and the reference work "The Presidents," he is a frequent commentator on radio and television. Graff lives in New York.
Series editor, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., is the preeminent historian of our time. For more than half a century, he has been a cornerstone figure in the intellectual life of the nation and a fixture on the political scene. He served as a special assistant to John F. Kennedy; won two Pulitzer Prizes for "The Age of Jackson" and "A Thousand Days;" and in 1998 received the National Humanities Medal. he published the first volume of his autobiography, "A Life in the Twentieth Century," in 2000.

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