Rabelais and His World

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Indiana University Press, Jan 1, 1984 - Literary Criticism - 484 pages
26 Reviews

This classic work by the Russian philosopher and literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin (18951975) examines popular humor and folk culture in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. One of the essential texts of a theorist who is rapidly becoming a major reference in contemporary thought, Rabelais and His World is essential reading for anyone interested in problems of language and text and in cultural interpretation.

  

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Review: Rabelais and His World

User Review  - Tom - Goodreads

Quintessential literary theory. Just a shame I know virtually nothing about Rabelais, or his works. For clarity's sake; I have skipped the parts that pertained solely to Rabelais. There was just no ... Read full review

Review: Rabelais and His World

User Review  - Stephanie - Goodreads

Interesting but where are Bakhtin's proofs for his assertions? He made a lot of axiomatic statements without qualifying them. Troubling. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
ONE Rabelais in the History of Laughter
59
TWO The Language of the Marketplace in Rabelais
145
THREE PopularFestive Forms and Images in Rabelais
196
FOUR Banquet Imagery in Rabelais
278
FIVE The Grotesque Image of the Body and Its Sources
303
SIX Images of the Material Bodily Lower Stratum
368
SEVEN Rabelais Images and His Time
437
INDEX
475
Copyright

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About the author (1984)

Mikhail Bakhtin was born on November 17, 1895 in Orel, Russia. He attended the University of Petrograd from 1913 to 1918, where he studied classics and philology. After graduation, he taught, wrote, and developed many of his theories. From 1945 to 1961, Bakhtin taught at the Mordovia Teachers Training College. He continued to publish works and develop theories such as that of dialogics, which contends that language evolves dynamically and both shapes and is shaped by culture. The theories are explored in Art and Answerability and The Dialogic Imagination. Bakhtin wrote several of his early works under the pseudonyms of his friends P.N. Medvedev and V.N. Voloshinov. He was persecuted under the Stalin regime for his philosophies and sentenced to six years imprisonment. A bone disease that ultimately forced the amputation of his right leg in 1938 further complicated his troubles. Bakhtin died on March 7, 1975.

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