A History of Dumfries and Galloway (Google eBook)

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William Blackwood and Sons, 1896 - Dumfries and Galloway (Scotland) - 411 pages
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Page 228 - Willie, Against the truce of Border tide ? And forgotten that the bauld Buccleuch Is Keeper here on the Scottish side ? And have they ta'en him, Kinmont Willie, Withouten either dread or fear ? And forgotten that the bauld Buccleuch Can back a steed or shake a spear
Page 229 - Then shoulder high, wi' shout and cry, We bore him down the ladder lang, At every stride Red Rowan made I wot the Kinmont's aims played clang. ' O mony a time,' quo' Kinmont Willie, ' I have ridden horse baith wild and wud,
Page 115 - The knights and squires are well mounted on large bay horses, the common people on little Galloways. They bring no carriages with them, on account of the mountains they have to pass in Northumberland ; neither do they carry with them any provision of bread or wine, for their
Page 115 - with them any provision of bread or wine, for their habits of sobriety are such in time of war that they will live a long time on flesh half sodden, without bread, and drink the river water without wine. They have, therefore, no occasion for pots
Page 408 - Alexander— A True relation of an Apparition, Expressions, and Actings of a Spirit which infested the House of Andrew Mackie in Ring-Croft of Stocking, in the Paroch of Rerrick, in the Stewartry of Kirkcudbright, in Scotland. By Mr Alexander Telfair, Minister of that Paroch, and attested by many other Persons, who were also Eye- and Ear-Witnesses.
Page 115 - half sodden, without bread, and drink the river water without wine. They have, therefore, no occasion for pots and pans, for they dress the flesh of their cattle in the skins after they have taken them off; and being sure to find plenty of
Page 171 - 'Grant me my lyfe, my liege, my king! And a brave gift I'll gie to thee— All between heir and Newcastle town Sail pay their yeirly rent to thee.' ' Away, away, thou traytor sträng ! Out o
Page 115 - The Scots are bold, hardy, and much inured to war. When they make their invasions into England they march from twenty to four-and-twenty miles without halting, as well by night as day—for they are all on horseback, except the camp-followers, who are on foot.
Page 227 - They band his legs beneath the steed, They tied his hands behind his back, They guarded him fivesome on each side. And they brought him ower the Liddel-rack.
Page 316 - ignominious and painful parts of it are usually remitted by the grace of the Crown to persons of your quality ; but the law in this case being deaf to all distinctions of persons, requires I should pronounce, and accordingly it is adjudged by this Court, that you, James Earl of Derwentwater, William Lord Widdrington, William Earl of Nithsdale, Robert Earl of

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