Vicissitudes of families, and other essays (Google eBook)

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Page 248 - The seas are quiet when the winds give o'er; So, calm are we when passions are no more! For then we know how vain it was to boast Of fleeting things, so certain to be lost.
Page 341 - Without force, or opposition, it subdued the fierceness of pride and power; it obliged sovereigns to submit to the soft collar of social esteem, compelled stern authority to submit to elegance, and gave a dominating vanquisher of laws, to be subdued by manners.
Page 80 - The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung, On once a flock-bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-tied curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies...
Page 243 - Twas thine own Genius gave the final blow, And helped to plant the wound that laid thee low : So the struck Eagle, stretched upon the plain, No more through rolling clouds to soar again, Viewed his own feather on the fatal dart, And winged the shaft that quivered in his heart ; Keen were his pangs, but keener far to feel He nursed the pinion which impelled the steel ; While the same plumage that had warmed his nest Drank the last life-drop of his bleeding breast.
Page 40 - He hath filled the hungry with good things ; and the rich He hath sent empty away.
Page 242 - Twas thine own genius gave the final blow, And help'd to plant the wound that laid thee low: So the struck eagle, stretch'd upon the plain, No more through rolling clouds to soar again, View'd his own feather on the fatal dart, And wing'd the shaft that quiver'd in his heart; Keen were his pangs, but keener far to feel, He nursed the pinion which impell'd the steel; While the same plumage that had warm'd his nest . Drank the last life-drop of his bleeding breast.
Page 355 - And matcht in race the chariot of the sun ; This Pythagorean ship (for it may claim Without presumption, so deserved a name), By knowledge once, and transformation now, In her new shape, this sacred port allow. Drake and his ship could not have wish'd from fate An happier station, or more blest estate ; For lo ! a seat of endless rest is given To her in Oxford, and to him in Heaven.
Page 117 - There are twenty of Roslin's barons bold Lie buried within that proud chapelle ; Each one the holy vault doth hold But the sea holds lovely Rosabelle. And each St. Clair was buried there, With candle, with book, and with knell, But the sea-caves rung, and the wild winds sung The dirge of lovely Rosabelle...
Page 355 - TO this great ship, which round the globe has run, And match'd in race the chariot of the sun, This Pythagorean ship (for it may claim Without presumption so deserv'da name, By knowledge once, and transformation now) In her new shape, this sacred port allow. Drake and his ship could not have wish'd from Fate A more blest station, or more blest estate ; For, lo ! a seat of endless rest is given To her in Oxford, and to him in heaven.
Page 202 - Whole ages have fled and their works decayed, And nations have scattered been ; But the stout old Ivy shall never fade, From its hale and hearty green. The brave old plant in its lonely days, Shall fatten upon the past: For the stateliest building man can raise, Is the Ivy's food at last. Creeping on, where time has been, A rare old plant is the Ivy green.

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