New Guinea: Crossing Boundaries and History (Google eBook)

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University of Hawaii Press, 2003 - History - 274 pages
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New Guinea, the world's largest tropical island, is a land of great contrasts, ranging from small glaciers on its highest peaks to broad mangrove swamps in its lowlands and hundreds of smaller islands and coral atolls along its coasts. Divided between two nations, the island and its neighboring archipelagos form Indonesia's Papua Province (or Irian Jaya) and the independent nation of Papua New Guinea, both former European colonies. Most books on New Guinea have been guided by these and other divisions, separating east from west, prehistoric from historic, precontact from postcontact, colonial from postcolonial. This is the first work to consider New Guinea and its 40,000-year history in its entirety. The volume opens with a look at the Melanesian region, arguing that interlocking exchange systems and associated human interchanges are the invisible government through which New Guinea societies operate. Succeeding chapters review the history of encounters between outsiders and New Guinea's populations. The impact of colonial rule, economic and social change, World War II, decolonization, and independence are discussed in the final chapter.
  

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Contents

Environment and People 400005000 BP
15
Cultural Spheres and Trade Systems The Last 5000 Years
34
West New Guinea and the Malay World
57
West New Guinea European Trade and Settlement 15201880
74
The Nineteenth Century Trade Settlement and Missionaries
103
The Nineteenth Century Exploration and Colonization
133
Interpreting Early Contact
154
The Twentieth Century Colonialism and Independence
179
Notes
205
Bibliography
227
Index
263
Copyright

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Page 244 - GUINEA, with an Historical introduction and Supplementary Chapters on the Manners and Customs of the Papuans.

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About the author (2003)

Clive Moore is reader in history and head of the history department at the University of Queensland, Brisbane.

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