Peter Parley's Common School History: Ilustrated by Engravings (Google eBook)

Front Cover
E.H. Butler & Company, 1850 - World history - 309 pages
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Contents

About the Hebrews or Jews Origin of the Hebrews The Removal of Jacob and his Children to Egypt
25
The Bondage in Egypt Flight of the Hebrews and Destruction of Pharaoh and his Host
26
About the Wanderings of the Israelites in the Wilderness
28
Overthrow of the Midianites Samson Judge of Israel
30
Samsons Exploits and Death
32
Beginning of the Reign of Saul
34
Combat of David and Goliath
35
The reign of David Wisdom of Solomon
36
The Building of the Temple Visit of the Queen of Sheba
37
The Decline of the Jewish Nation
39
Crucifixion of the Saviour Destruction of Jerusalem
43
Cyrus conquers Babylon His Death
44
Reign of Cambyses
45
Expedition of Xerxes into Greece
46
Affairs of Persia till the Saracen Conquest
48
Modern History of Persia
49
Early History of China
51
Anecdotes of the Chinese Emperors
52
Cities of China Manners of the Chinese
54
Origin of the Arabs Rise of Mahomet
55
Sequel of the History of the Saracens i
57
About Syria Phaenicia and Asia Minor
61
Review of the History of Asia
62
XXXVH Chronolgy of Asia
66
About the Geography of Africa The Inhabitants
67
Early Sovereigns of Egypt
69
Egyptian Architecture and Sculpture 7J XLt The Ptolemies and Queen Cleopatra
71
CHAPTER rial XLII Sequel of the Egyptian History
76
Summary of Ethiopian Matters
77
XLFV Origin of the fiarbary States and their Piracies on the Christians
78
Fables and Facts about Africa
79
History of the SlaveTrade
80
XLVU Chronology of Africa
81
EUROPE
82
Introductory Remarks on its Geography and other Hatters
83
XL1X About Greece where it is situated Appearance of the Country Cli
86
The Extent of Greece First Settlement of the Country
88
The Grecian Lawgivers
89
War with Persia
90
Affairs of Athens
91
Beginning of the Theban War
94
Grecian Religion or Mythology
95
The Grecian Philosophers
99
The Grecian Philosophers continued
100
Something more about Philosophers About the Greek Poets
101
About the Mode of Life among the Ancient Greeks
102
Philip of Macedon conquers Greece 104
104
Conquests of Alexander the Great
106
Greece invaded by the Gauls
109
End of Grecian Independence
110
Modern History of Greece
111
About Italy as it now i
112
Founding of Rome by Romulus Its early State
116
Battle of the Horatii and Curiatii
118
From the reign of Ancus Martiustill the Expulsion of the Kings
119
The Story of Coriolauus
121
Rome invaded by the Gauls The first Funic War
122
Second and third Punic Wars
124
Scipios Triumph
125
Sylla and Marius
126
Cneius Ponipey and Julius Caesar
127
Cstsar usurps the Supreme Power
128
Assassination of Julius Caesar
129
Consequences of Caesars Death 180
132
The Means by which Rome acquired its Power
133
Rome under the Emperors
134
Fall of the Western Empire of the Romans
136
Progress of the Decline of Rome
137
Manners and Customs of the Ancient Romans 189
138
About Religion Deities Temples Marriage
140
SXVII About Funeral Rites and Ceremonies
142
Roman Farms Mode of Ploughing Farm Houses Grain Cattle Superstitions of the Fanners Gardens Vines
144
Country Houses Description of Plinys Villa Aqueducts
145
Military Affairs of the Romans Division of the Army The Imperial Eagle Music Arms Dress Military Rewards Crowns The Triumph
147
About Naval Affairs The War Galley Commerce Shows of Wild Beasts Exhibitions of Gladiators
149
Sports Chariot Racing The Circus Carriages Private Entertain ments Supper Rooms Convivial Parties Luxuries
150
About Theatres Clocks and Watches The Fine Arts Books and Writing Costume Conclusion
152
XCrV Rome under the Popes
153
About several other Italian States 196
156
XTVL About the Ottoman Empire Turkey in Europe Turkey in Asia About the Climate People and other Things
157
CHAPTER rial XC VII About the Saracens How the Turks overturned the Saracen Empire How the Ottoman Turks founded the Ottoman Empire Ab...
159
Sequel of the Turkish History 160
160
The Gauls Origin of the French Nation Little King Pepin
173
About Clovis and little King Pepin
174
The Reign of Charlemagne
176
About the Crusades or Holy Wars
177
About the Feudal System
180
About Chivalry or KnightErrantry
182
More about Chivalry
184
King Philip and Pope Boniface Wars of the French and English
186
The Reigns of several French Kings
189
The Reigns of Louis the Grand and his Successor
190
The French Revolution
192
The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte
194
The Fall of Bonaparte
196
Recent Affairs of France
198
About Germany
199
About the Ancient Tribes of Germany Charlemagne c
200
Affairs of Switzerland
201
Sequel of German History
203
About Austria Hungary fcc
205
About Hungary Bohemia the Tyrol 8te
206
About Prussia
208
History of Prussia
209
Description of Russia
210
Description of Russia continued
212
The Reign of Peter theGreat
214
The Successors of Peter the Great
216
About Sweden
217
Charles the Twciah and his Successors
219
About Lapland Norway and Denmark
220
Brief Notices of several Kingdoms and States
222
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
223
About Loiult n and other Cities of England Wales Scotland and Ireland
224
Origin of the British Nation The Druids
227
Saon and Danish Kings of England
229
Norman Kings of England
230
English Wars and Rebellions 332
232
The Lancastrian Kings of England
233
Wars of tho Roses 336
237
The Reign of Elizabeth
238
Accession of the House of Stuart
240
Wars of the King and Parliament
242
The Protectorate and the Restoration
244
The Revolution of 1688 and other Mitters
246
The Hanoverian Kings of Great Britain
247
The Story of Wales
249
The Story of Scotland
250
About Ireland
252
Matters and Things
253
Review The Dark Ages Important Inventions lie
255
CLVH Chronology of Europe
258
Abort America 363
266
Discovery of America by Columbus
267
A few Words about Iceland and Greenland Settlement of the French in America
268
The French Colonies conquered by the English
270
CLX1II Description of the United States
272
Settlement and Colonial History of New England
274
Affairs of New England continued 376
275
Early History of Virginia
276
Braddocks Defeat and other Matters
277
Causes which led to the Revolution
278
Account of the Battle of Lexington
279
The Battle of Bunker Hill 230
280
Progress of the War Capture of Burgoyne
281
War in the South Surrender of Cornwallis
284
Affairs of the United States since the Revolution
285
General Remarks upon the History of the United States
286
About South America El Dorado and the Fountain of Youth
289
History of the Mexican Territories Guatimala
291
Spanish Peruvian Territories
293
Account of the Brazilian Territories
294
The West Indie
295
The West Indies continued
297
The West Indies continued
298
Chronology of America
300
About Oceania The Malaysian Islands
301
The Australian Division of Oceania
302
Polynesia The Sandwich Islands
303
LXXXVIII Polynesia continued The Society Islands
305
Story of the Bounty concluded
306
Chronology of Oceania
307
General Views
308

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 154 - In 1077 Pope Gregory obliged Henry IV., emperor of Germany, to stand three days, in the depth of winter, barefooted at his castle gate, to implore his pardon. In...
Page 189 - In 1560, Charles the Ninth became king of France. He was then a boy of ten years old. His reign was disgraced by one of the bloodiest scenes in history. It is called the Massacre of St. Bartholomew.
Page 51 - It is bounded on the north by Asiatic Russia, on the east by the Pacific Ocean, and on the south by the Chinese Sea and Farther India. On the west there are mountains and sandy deserts, which divide it from Thibet and Tartary.
Page 151 - The horses were yoked to the carriage by means of a curved cross-bar, passing over their necks, and were directed by bridles and reins, which were sometimes of embroidered silk, with gold bits. 7. Besides mules and horses, many other animals were occasionally used in carriages, such as dogs, goats, and deer, and even bears, leopards, lions, and tigers. But this, of course, was merely for a whimsical amusement, and not for real service.
Page 143 - ... were quenched with wine. The ashes were collected and placed in a costly urn, which was deposited in the family sepulchre. In the funeral solemnities of a soldier, his arms, and the spoils he had won from the enemy, were sometimes added to the funeral pile. 11. It was a horrid belief of the heathen nations, that the spirits of the dead were pleased with blood. It was their custom to sacrifice on the tomb of the deceased those animals to which he was most attached during his life. In the more...
Page 201 - Germany, and other countries. 9. The empire of Germany, thus established, was, however, composed of many separate sovereignties, each of which had its own ruler. In the year 912, it became the custom for these rulers to make choice of one of their number, and declare him emperor. He then presided over the whole of Germany. Thus Germany was what is called an elective monarchy, and so it continued even so late as the year 1806. 10.
Page 112 - Many people from other countries went to assist the Greeks. The ancient renown of Greece made friends of all who were acquainted with her history. Lord Byron, the illustrious English poet, lost his life in Greece, for the sake of this famous land.
Page 234 - As long as his father lived, the king's eldest son was a wild ana dissipated young man. But no sooner was the old king dead, than his character underwent a complete change. He now threw off his dissipation and devoted himself carefully to the business of governing his kingdom. He was crowned, as Henry the Fifth, in 1413. Two years afterwards he invaded France. 4. I have already told, in the history of France, how Henry vanquished the French in the famous battle of Agincourt, and how he afterwards...
Page 231 - Runnymede, and compelled him to sign a written deed, called Magna Charta. This famous charter was dated the 19th of June, 1215. It is considered the foundation of English liberty. It deprived John, and all his successors, of the despotic power which former kings had exercised. 11. King John died in 1216, and left the crown to his son, who was then only nine years old. He was called Henry the Third. His reign continued fifty-five years; but, though he was a well-meaning man, he had not sufficient...
Page 104 - Greeks were very fond of flesh. Their usual drink was water, either hot or cold, but most commonly the latter, which was sometimes cooled with ice. Wines were very generally used, and even perfumed wines were introduced at the tables of the rich. 6. Before the Greeks went to an entertainment, they washed and anointed themselves ; when they arrived, the entertainer took them by the hand, or kissed their lips, hands, knees, or feet, as they deserved more or less respect. It must be observed concerning...

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