The History of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Joe N. Ballard
DIANE Publishing, Feb 1, 1998 - History - 159 pages
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An overview of the many missions that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (CoE) have performed in support of the Army and the nation since the early days of the Amer. Revolution. This heavily illustrated history looks at the role of the CoE in times of war as well as in building projects in the U.S. and other nations. Includes chapters on explorations and surveys, lighthouses, hydropower development, flood control, waterway development, the Panama Canal, the environmental challenge, the Manhattan Project, the space program, and changing military responsibilities and relationships. Portraits and profiles of the CoE's highest ranking officers are also included.
  

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Contents

III
17
IV
21
V
23
VI
25
VII
29
VIII
33
IX
35
X
37
XVI
65
XVII
69
XVIII
79
XIX
83
XX
91
XXI
95
XXII
101
XXIII
109

XI
41
XII
47
XIII
53
XIV
57
XV
61
XXIV
115
XXV
127
XXVI
138
XXVIII
139
XXIX
153

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Page 103 - With the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, our security environment has undergone profound transformation.
Page 130 - States, and their tributaries, whereon power development appears feasible and practicable, with a view to the formulation of general plans for the most effective improvement of such streams for the purposes of navigation and the prosecution of such improvement in combination with the most efficient development of the potential water power, the control of floods, and the needs of irrigation...
Page 51 - Congress that flood control on navigable waters or their tributaries is a proper activity of the Federal Government in cooperation with States, their political subdivisions, and localities thereof...
Page 151 - Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit with two oak leaf clusters, the Joint Service Commendation Medal and the Order of National Security Merit from the Republic of Korea.
Page 129 - ... suit me at all. You come in here with a lot of propositions which you have approved, and you want me to approve, to improve the navigation of such and such a river and such and such a creek and such and such a harbor, I want to know how does that compare with the situation of the whole ? " He said, " I have nothing to do with that.
Page 130 - Congress, first session, shall be supplemented by such additional study or Investigation as the Chief of Engineers finds necessary to take into account important changes in economic factors as they occur, and additional stream-flow records, or other factual data.
Page 27 - ... service of the engineer is limited to constructing, connecting, consolidating, and keeping in repair fortifications. This is but a single branch of their profession, though indeed a most important one. Their utility extends to almost every department of war and every description of general officers, besides embracing whatever respects public buildings, roads, bridges, canals, and all such works of a civil nature.
Page 150 - Military awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit (with two Oak Leaf Clusters) , Bronze Star Medal (with "V...
Page 152 - ... Silver Hourglass, the Army Service Ribbon and the Army Staff Identification Badge. His civilian education includes a Bachelor's Degree in Education from Southeast Missouri State College and a Master's Degree in Public Administration from Shippensburg University. His military education includes the Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, the Command and General Staff College and the Army War College. Mr. Chairman and members of the subcommittee, it is a pleasure to appear before you to discuss the...
Page 48 - While I willingly admit that all the speculations of a man of intellect are full of interest, and deserving of careful thought, yet I cannot agree with him that these reservoirs would have any good or preventive effects upon the pernicious inundations of this river, and even doubt if the waters so proposed to be collected have any appreciable, and certainly not an injurious effect, upon the inundated region.

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