The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being the Letters of Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, John Adams, John Jay, Arthur Lee, William Lee, Ralph Izard, Francis Dana, William Carmichael, Henry Laurens, John Laurens, M. Dumas, and Others, Concerning the Foreign Relations of the United States During the Whole Revolution; Together with the Letters in Reply from the Secret Committee of Congress, and the Secretary of Foreign Affairs. Also, the Entire Correspondence of the French Ministers, Gerard and Luzerne, with Congress, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J.C. Rives, 1818 - United States
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Contents

To John Jay Paris December 3 1776
67
To Count de Vergennes Paris December 8 1776
75
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris September 3 1777
83
To the President of Congress Delaware Bay July 10 1778
90
To the President of Congress Philadelphia September 221778
92
To the President of Congress Philadelphia October 121778
103
To the President of Congress Philadelphia October 121778
114
To the President of Congress Philadelphia November 191778127
127
To the President of Congress Philadelphia February 22 1 779133
133
To the President of Congress Philadelphia April 27 1779
143
Holkers Answer Philadelphia April 26 1779
144
To the President of Congress Philadelphia August 18 1779
156
CORRESPONDENCE OF THE COMMISSIONERS AT THE COURT
163
Committee of Secret Correspondence to the Commissioners Balti
180
Committee of Secret Correspondence to William Bingham at Mar
187
Agreement between theCommissioners and certain French officers
194
Agreement between Messrs Franklin and Deane and the Farmers
206
Committee of Foreign Affairs to the Commissioners Philadelphia
209
May 9 1777
212
Committee of Foreign Affairs to the Commissioners Philadelphia
219
July 2 1777
227
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Passy September 81777233
233
October 6 1777
241
J Committee of Foreign Affairs to William Bingham York March
271
Draught of a proposed letter from the Commissioners to the Grand
275
To the President of Congress Passy July 20 1778
297
Abraham Whipple to John Paul Jones Brest August 191778311
311
Declaration of Count de Vergennes annulling the Eleventh
315
To the President of Congress Passy September 17 1778
324
de Sartine to the Commissioners Versailles September
330
To William Lee Passy September 26 1778
334
de Sartine Passy October 2 1778
341
de Sartine Passy October 13 1778
347
Dumas to the Commissioners Hague October 27 1778
351
de Sartine to the Commissioners Versailles November
364
de Sartine Passy January 2 1779
371
CORRESPONDENCE OF ARTHUR
377
To Lieutenant Governor Colden London February 141776383
383
Record of the Committee of Secret Correspondence Philadelphia
387
To the Committee of Secret Correspondence Nantes February
395
To the Committee of Secret Correspondence Bordeaux February
401
To Benjamin Franklin Chaillot March 27 1778
480
James Gardoqui k Co to Arthur Lee Bilboa April 1 1778
481
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris April 5 1778
487
Count de Vergennes to Arthur Lee Versailles April 24 1778
493
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris August 311778
514
To James Gardoqui Paris October 6 1778
518
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris November 151778
524
To Count de Vergennes Chaillot January 3 1779
535
Count de Vergennes to Arthur Lee Versailles January 101779539
539
Benjamin Franklin to Arthur Lee Passy February 18 1779
545
Benjamin Franklin to Arthur Lee Passy March 13 1779
551
To the President of Congress Paris May 31 1779
558
Committee of Foreign Affairs to Arthur Lee Philadelphia July
564
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris October 211779
572
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris December 8 1779
578
Instructions to William Lee Philadelphia July 1 1777
591
To the President of Congress Paris January 22 1778
598
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Frankfort October
606
To the President of Congress Paris March 16 1779
628
James Lovell to William Lee Philadelphia September
642
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Paris October 6 1777
648
To Benjamin Franklin Paris January 30 1778
654
Benjamin Franklin to Ralph Izard Passy March 27 1778
660
To Benjamin Franklin Paris April 4 1778
664
Committee of Foreign Affairs to Ralph Izard York May
670
To Benjamin Franklin Paris June 17 1778
676
To Henry Laurens President of Congress Paris June
683
Abbe Niccoli to Ralph Izard Florence July 28 1778
689
To Henry Laurens President of Congress Paris September
695
Committee of Foreign Affairs to Ralph Izard Philadelphia October
699
To the President of Congress Philadelphia August 6 1780
705
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs Charleston January
711
To the President of Congress Nantes September 5 1782
723
Robert R Livingston to Henry Laurens Philadelphia September
725
To the Secretary of Foreign Affairs Paris December 241782731
731
To the Secretary of Foreign Affairs London April 10 1783
738
Observations and propositions of Mr Hartley left with the American
744
To the Secretary of Foreign Affairs Bath June 27 1783
746
To the Secretary of Foreign Affairs London August 91783
754
To the President of Congress London April 24 1784
760

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Popular passages

Page 634 - laden therein, from any port to the places of those who now are or hereafter may or shall be at enmity with the said States of the Seven United Provinces of Holland, or the said United States of America. It shall be also lawful for the subjects and citizens aforesaid, to sail with the ships and
Page 636 - goods whatsoever which have not been worked into the form of any instrument or thing prepared for war, by land or by sea, shall not be reputed contraband, much less such as have been already wrought and made up for any other use; all which shall be wholly reckoned among free goods; as likewise all other
Page 630 - be any just grounds of suspicion, shall be obliged to exhibit, as well upon the high seas as in the ports and havens, not only her passports, but likewise certificates expressly showing that her goods are not of the number of those which have been prohibited as contraband. ARTICLE XVIII. If, by exhibiting the
Page 737 - to run this risk, and make this experiment upon your indulgence, which, at least, I must desire you to accord to me. This will add yet more to the lively and sincere acknowledgment, with which I have the honor to be, sir, your very humble, and very obedient servant,
Page 635 - them, fire balls, gunpowder, match, cannon balls, pikes, swords, lances, spears, halberts, mortars, petards, grenades, saltpetre, muskets, musket balls, helmets, headpieces, breastplates, coats of mail, and the like kinds of arms proper for arming soldiers, musket rests, belts, horses, with their furniture, and all other warlike instruments whatever. The
Page 631 - people, or inhabitants of either party on any ship belonging to the enemy of the other, or to their subjects, the whole, although it be not of the sort of prohibited goods, may be confiscated in the same manner as if it belonged to the enemy himself, except such goods and
Page 636 - such ships or vessels being laden are to be provided not only with passports, as above mentioned, but also with certificates containing the several particulars of the cargo, the place from whence the ship sailed, and whither she is bound, that so it may be known whether
Page 631 - prohibited or otherwise, which, as aforesaid, were put on board any ship belonging to an enemy before the war, or after the declaration of the same, without knowledge of it, shall no ways be liable to confiscation, but shall well and truly be restored, without delay, to the proprietors demanding the same; but so as that if the said
Page 632 - to such as shall have made prize of the subjects, people, or property of either of the parties ; but if such shall come in, being forced by stress of weather or the danger of the seas, all proper means shall be vigorously used that they go out and retire from thence as soon as possible.
Page 636 - or vessel, as also the name, place, or habitation of the master, or commander of the said ship or vessel, that it may appear thereby that the ship really and truly belongs to the subjects or citizens of one of the parties, which passport

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