A Diary from Dixie

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Harvard University Press, 1980 - Biography & Autobiography - 572 pages
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One of the most important documents in southern history, this is a day-by-day diary of the Civil War years. It rings with authenticity while evoking the nostalgia, bitterness, and comedy of the Confederacy.
  

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Contents

CHARLESTON I
1
MONTGOMERY
5
CAM DEN
23
CHARLESTON
27
CAMDEN
41
MONTGOMERY
45
CAMDEN
53
RICHMOND
65
COLUMBIA
185
FLAT ROCK
274
MEMORIES
277
CAMDEN
318
RICHMOND
321
CAMDEN
403
COLUMBIA
416
LINCOLNTON N C
478

FAUQUIER WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS
76
RICHMOND
81
CAMDEN
134
COLUMBIA
178
CAMDEN
181
CHESTER
507
CAMDEN
527
INDEX
549
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

Mary Chesnut was a Southern-aristocrat daughter of the governor of South Carolina and the wife of a U.S. senator who helped draft the South's secession ordinance and then served the Confederate government during the Civil War. Chesnut was also a gifted writer. She began her daily journal in 1860 and revised it after the Civil War. While the basis for A Diary from Dixie (1905) is her daily journal, her composition process was more akin to that of fiction. She willed her diary to her friend Isabella Martin, who cut it to a third of its original length before publishing it in 1905. Ben Ames Williams, a novelist, edited a more complete version in 1949, including much of the interesting gossip and rumors that had been cut from the first edition. The historian Vann Woodward edited yet another version from original manuscripts, Mary Chesnut's Civil War (1981). The Diary gives an invaluable record of Confederate society and war efforts, as well as a frank picture of the Chesnuts' marriage. Although her views on African Americans are far from enlightened by modern standards, Mary Chesnut hated slavery and the necessity for women to pretend innocence about the mulatto children in their households. Along with its engaging picture of Confederate life, Chesnut's Diary reveals the dilemma of women of wit and intelligence in a repressive society.

Ben Ames Williams (1889-1953) was the author of more than 30 novels, including "All the Brothers Were Valiant," "Come Spring," "House Divided," "The Strumpet Sea," and "The Unconquered

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