Dictionary of Philosophy

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Prometheus Books, 1999 - Philosophy - 316 pages
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Bunge (logic and metaphysics, McGill U.) defines most terms quickly and succinctly, but throws in a few longer definitions. His focus is contemporary philosophy, so he excludes many traditional and archaic terms now little used. He also employs special characters and symbols, mostly from formal log

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Dictionary of philosophy

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Adopting "a naturalist and scientistic standpoint" rather than staying "neutral," Bunge (Finding Philosophy in Social Science, Yale Univ., 1996) claims to define only philosophical terms of "enduring ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
7
Section 3
29
Section 4
34
Section 5
57
Section 6
73
Section 7
97
Section 8
112
Section 14
167
Section 15
190
Section 16
198
Section 17
205
Section 18
233
Section 19
237
Section 20
256
Section 21
290

Section 9
119
Section 10
126
Section 11
149
Section 12
151
Section 13
153
Section 22
302
Section 23
306
Section 24
311
Section 25
315
Copyright

About the author (1999)

prolific author on all aspects of the philosophy of science and a pioneer in philosophy of technology, Mario Augusto Bunge was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1919 and educated at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, receiving his Ph.D. in physics in 1952. He did research work in and taught theoretical physics in Argentina before moving to the United States in 1960, where he taught at several universities, including the University of Pennsylvania, Texas, Delaware, and Temple University. He moved to Montreal in 1966, where he remains and has been Frothingham Professor of Logic and Metaphysics at McGill University since 1981. Bunge insists on describing both science and technology exactly as they are. His pioneering approach to the philosophy of technology includes a clear characterization of all the components of technological systems in systems-theory terms, including their value commitments and relationships to other institutions. Outspokenly critical of what he views as pseudo-science, including psychoanalysis, Bunge is equally strong in his defenses of democracy, although he also sees it as subject to much abuse.

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