Shakespeariana; a Critical and Contemporary Review of Shakespearian Literature, Volume 8 (Google eBook)

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L. Scott Publishing Company, 1891
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Page 163 - I' the commonwealth I would by contraries Execute all things ; for no kind of traffic Would I admit ; no name of magistrate ; Letters should not be known ; riches, poverty, And use of service, none ; contract, succession, Bourn, bound of land, tilth, vineyard, none ; No use of metal, corn, or wine, or oil ; No occupation ; all men idle, all ; And women too, but innocent and pure ; No sovereignty, Seb.
Page 107 - Such an act That blurs the grace and blush of modesty; Calls virtue hypocrite; takes off the rose From the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there; makes marriage vows As false as dicers...
Page 106 - What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed ? a beast, no more. Sure, he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unused.
Page 215 - Fear no more the frown o' the great; Thou art past the tyrant's stroke; Care no more to clothe and eat; To thee the reed is as the oak. The sceptre, learning, physic, must All follow this, and come to dust.
Page 109 - That, for some vicious mole of nature in them, As in their birth, wherein they are not guilty, Since nature cannot choose his origin; By the o'ergrowth of some complexion, Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason...
Page 28 - Of fruits, and flowers, and bunches of knot-grass, And diamonded with panes of quaint device, Innumerable of stains and splendid dyes, As are the tiger-moth's deep-damask'd wings; And in the midst, 'mong thousand heraldries, And twilight saints, and dim emblazonings, A shielded scutcheon blush'd with blood of queens and kings.
Page 200 - My conceit of his person was never increased toward him by his place, or honours, but I have and do reverence him, for the greatness that was only proper to himself, in that he seemed to me ever, by his work, one of the greatest men, and most worthy of admiration, that had been in many ages. In his adversity I ever prayed that God would give him strength ; for greatness he could not want.
Page 79 - No doubt some mouldy tale, Like Pericles and stale As the shrieve's crusts, and nasty as his fish Scraps, out of every dish Thrown forth, and raked into the common tub, May keep up the Play-club...
Page 239 - The Second part of Henrie the fourth, continuing to his death, and coronation of Henrie the fift. With the humours of Sir John Falstaffe, and swaggering Pistoll. As it hath been sundrie times publikely acted by the right honourable, the Lord Chamberlaine his seruants. Written by William Shakespeare. London Printed by VS for Andrew Wise, and William Aspley. 1600.
Page 43 - Shakespeare was godfather to one of Ben Jonson's children, and, after the christening, being in a deep study, Jonson came to cheer him up, and asked him why he was so melancholy. ' No faith, Ben,' says he, ' not I, but I have been considering a great while what should be the fittest gift for me to bestow upon my godchild, and I have resolved at last.' ' I prythee, what ? ' says he. ' I* faith, Ben, I'll e'en give him a dozen good Latin (latten) spoons, and thou shalt translate them.

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