The Oriental Tradition of Paul of Aegina's Pragmateia

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BRILL, Jan 1, 2004 - Science - 337 pages
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The volume investigates how Paul of Aegina's medical handbook or "pragmateia" was transmitted and transformed through Syriac and Arabic translations, becoming one of the cornerstones of the Islamic medical tradition. It uses new manuscript evidence in order to explore the crucial impact of Paul's "pragmateia," tracing its steps through different languages and cultures in the Middle East. A discussion of different Syriac and Arabic authors who quote the "pragmateia" such as Ibn Serapion and Rhazes is followed by detailed studies of Greek-Syriac-Arabic translation technique, examining, for instance, ophthalmologic terminology, and giving a critical appraisal of translation syntax and lexicography. Paul's influence on the development of medical theory in the Islamic world and beyond is also addressed, making it an important contribution not only to Graeco-Arabic studies, but also to the history of medicine in general.
  

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Contents

Chapter One Syriac Sources
13
Conclusions
45
Chapter Two Arabic Sources
47
contents to part one Nightmare PAeg ch 3 15
79
Lycanthropy PAeg ch 3 16
80
Apoplexy PAeg ch 3 18
81
Spasms PAeg ch 3 19
87
Materia Medica PAeg book 7
89
Bedwetting
108
Prolapse of the Rectum
109
Indications of Childbirth
110
Conclusions
112
Monhmera Onedayremedies
115
Ciakon Chiac
116
Swancollyria Kukno Kuknarion
118
Nardinon Nardcollyrium
119

Unlocated quotations
90
Conclusions
91
AlBalad ī
92
Examination of Milk
95
Pustules and Ulcers
98
Cough
99
Teething
100
Thrush
101
Moisture in the Ears
102
Regimen for years 713
104
Regimen for years 1420
105
Cradlecap
106
Proliferating Flesh in the Ear
107
Rosecollyria
121
Contents to Part Two
125
Previous Scholarship 127 Chapter Three Terminology
135
Chapter Four Lexicography
223
Greek into Arabic
239
Chapter Six Comparative Translation Studies
259
Conclusions and Prospects
285
Contents to Part Three
291
General Conclusions
311
Bibliography
315
Greek
330
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Peter E. Pormann, D.Phil. (2002) in Classics, University of Oxford, is a Junior Research Fellow in Oriental Studies at Merton College, Oxford. He has published widely on Islamic medicine and its Greek antecedents, notably the Late Antique Alexandrian medical tradition. He has received The Hellenic Foundation's 2003 Award for the best doctoral thesis in the United Kingdom, in the Byzantine/Medieval History category.

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