King Arthur: Excalibur Unsheathed : an English Legend

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Graphic Universe ™, Jan 1, 2007 - Juvenile Nonfiction
4 Reviews
Young Arthur spends his days toiling as a squire--feeding the horses and hauling his big brother's armor. Around him, England is in turmoil, left without a king. But all that changes in one day, with one pull on the mysterious sword in the stone. Guided by Merlin the Magician, Arthur takes his place as the rightful heir to England's throne. He receives the sword Excalibur and wins the loyalty of the Knights of the Round Table. But can the young king win peace and freedom for England'
  

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Review: King Arthur (Graphic Myths And Legends)

User Review  - Emmet Miles - Goodreads

Pictures great, Story okay. 1. Sword in the stone 2. Arthur's army v. another king's army 3. Arthur v. Green Knight Read full review

Review: King Arthur (Graphic Myths And Legends)

User Review  - Emmet Miles - Goodreads

Pictures great, Story okay. 1. Sword in the stone 2. Arthur's army v. another king's army 3. Arthur v. Green Knight Read full review

Contents

A Country Without A King
8
The New King in A New Year
17
The Boy Becomes the King
21
The Lesson Taught to King Lot
25
The Collector of Beards
30
A Joust in the Forest
36
A Gift From the Lady of the Lake
44
Glossary
48
Further Reading and WebsitesCreating Excalibur Unsheathed
49
IndexAbout the Author and the Artist
50
Back Cover
52
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Sir Thomas Malory, 1405 - 1471 Sir Thomas Malory's works (consisting of the legends of Sir Lancelot, Sir Gareth, Sir Tristram, and the Holy Grail, as well as the stories of King Arthur's coming to the throne, his wars with the Emperor Lucius, and his death) are the most influential expression of Arthurian material in English. The author's sources are principally French romances; his own contributions are substantial, however, and the result is a vigorous and resonant prose. "Le Morte d'Arthur," finished between March 1469 and March 1470, was first printed in 1485 by William Caxton, the earliest English printer. Malory is presumed to have been a knight from an old Warwickshire family, who inherited his father's estates about 1433 and spent 20 years of his later life in jail accused of various crimes. The discovery of a manuscript version of "Le Morte d'Arthur" in 1934 in the library of Winchester College, supported the identification of Malory the author with Malory the traitor, burglar, and rapist. It showed that many of the inconsistencies in the printed text were traceable to the printing house rather than to the author. The most reliable modern version, therefore, is one like Eugene Vinaver's that is based on the Winchester manuscript.

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